Background

Fragments were gathered from a purported crashed unidentified aerial craft in the Plains of San Augustine, which occurred the first week of July in 1947. One fragment found by Chuck Wade (Wade-1) was previously analyzed by this Laboratory.1 A second fragment also found by Wade, called “I-beam”, was submitted for analysis. It is designated “I-Beam” because of its similar appearance to one. The object is to determine if there are any anomalous properties of the sample that could be related to an extraterrestrial craft. Specifically, one such anomaly would be the presence of fragment elements that have different isotopic ratios than their terrestrial counterparts. 

Conclusions

  • The I-Beam appearing fragment is mostly composed of aluminum coated with very small amounts of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) corrosion and environmental debris. The environmental debris include a protein-type material (animal, insect, mold or bacteria derived), calcite (calcium carbonate) and unidentified oxidized organic material which could be humate derived.
  • The analysis shows the fragment, excluding any environmental debris, is greater than 97% aluminum which appears to be alloyed with small amounts magnesium, silicon and possibly iron. This alloy is in the 6000 series classification by the International Alloy Designation System3. Specifically, 6060, 6061 or 6063 could be the aluminum grade. These, especially the most common 6061, have many uses: architectural and structural applications; automotive components; boats; aerospace; aircraft; etc. A search of the internet reveals many companies who manufacture I-Beams in these three aluminum grades, and they come in many sizes.
  • The analytical testing of this fragment does not reveal an indication of an extraterrestrial origin. Isotopic analysis done on nickel, copper and gallium are consistent with terrestrial values for these elements.

The Analysis

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