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Temple found in Turkey 7,000 yrs older than Egypt's Pyramids

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Postby SmokinJoe » Thu Feb 25, 2010 5:52 pm

HISTORY IN THE REMAKING

A temple complex in Turkey that predates even the pyramids is rewriting the story of human evolution.

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Berthold Steinhilber / Laif-Redux

A pillar at the Gobekli Tepe temple near Sanliurfa, Turkey, the oldest known temple in the world
By Patrick Symmes | NEWSWEEK
Published Feb 19, 2010
From the magazine issue dated Mar 1, 2010


They call it potbelly hill, after the soft, round contour of this final lookout in southeastern Turkey. To the north are forested mountains. East of the hill lies the biblical plain of Harran, and to the south is the Syrian border, visible 20 miles away, pointing toward the ancient lands of Mesopotamia and the Fertile Crescent, the region that gave rise to human civilization. And under our feet, according to archeologist Klaus Schmidt, are the stones that mark the spot—the exact spot—where humans began that ascent.

Standing on the hill at dawn, overseeing a team of 40 Kurdish diggers, the German-born archeologist waves a hand over his discovery here, a revolution in the story of human origins. Schmidt has uncovered a vast and beautiful temple complex, a structure so ancient that it may be the very first thing human beings ever built. The site isn't just old, it redefines old: the temple was built 11,500 years ago—a staggering 7,000 years before the Great Pyramid, and more than 6,000 years before Stonehenge first took shape. The ruins are so early that they predate villages, pottery, domesticated animals, and even agriculture—the first embers of civilization. In fact, Schmidt thinks the temple itself, built after the end of the last Ice Age by hunter-gatherers, became that ember—the spark that launched mankind toward farming, urban life, and all that followed.

Go to Newsweek for the rest:

http://www.newsweek.com/id/233844?from=rss
Dawkins thinks belief in God is an excuse to evade thinking in the scientific world. Sadly, he is ignorant to the list of christian scientists who have contributed & founded many of the sciences he himself believes in. How ironic.
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Postby sandra » Sat Feb 27, 2010 3:39 am

That is absolutely fascinating! Hope they learn more about this structure, I'm going to look if there is any more information on this.
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Postby Aquatank » Sat Feb 27, 2010 8:53 pm

Reminds me of when they found these in Dresden
http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/7-5-2005-72654.asp
tribal connection perhaps?
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Postby sandra » Sat Feb 27, 2010 9:09 pm

"So far the investigation into these massive temples suggests that each was ritually decommissioned, with the ditches surrounding the central complex being deliberately filled in."


That is an insert from that article Aquatank, what do they mean by that, do you know?
They dug out ditches and then filled them back in as some ritual? What significance could that have...hmmm.

How old are those in relation to the Turkish temple found?
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Postby Aquatank » Sun Feb 28, 2010 8:23 am

Well I know they circles they dug were ritual, every had the same amount dug out of it but not always to the same depth. My own hypothesis is that this ritual was originally defensive a form of protection against Mammoth and Mastadon herds (elephants can't fall very far or they break their legs, so dicthes were dug to prevent their passage) , and later came to have magickal-religious-symbolic meaning of a 'circle of protection'. By the time we get to the Dresden sites, the need for the physical protection is gone as was its original reason for being so oly the ritual unexplained for perhaps several millenia remained. Atleast thats what I personally think.

BP is an archaeological date it means "Before Present" and generally means before 1950. So when they say "years old" assume they mean BP. I'm adding in some more recent discoveries to give you some idea of the scope of things.

Fire treated tools in Africa date to 72000BP

The South Carolina Topper dig Fire Pit was dated at 50000BP

Disputed Oldest MEXICO Human footprint is allegedly 40000 BP

Oldest musical instrument found is a flute in Germany dated to 35000BP

the 2009 find of Clovis artifacts in Colorado are about 13000BP

The "Witch Doctor" skeleton found near the Sea of Galilee is 12000BP

The Turkey site is 11500BP (origin of thread)

A Wall Painting in Syria dates to 11000BP

The Dresden/German site is 7000BP (see above)

Britain's neolithic farm house near Callander is 6000BP

Britain's Sky Burial site at Stoney Middleton and Neolithic Temple at Somerset is 5000BP

Cunieform Writing appears around 4950BP

The newest Dates for the stones at Stone Henge are 4350BP-4950BP the ditch for it is older though around 5050BP

And the Egyptian Djoser Pyramid is around 4280BP

I'm not sure what to think of the alleged "Bosnian Pyramid: Visocica" yet, I think that was declared too soon without enough evidence to support the claim. It 's alleged date is around 10000BP. If the wikipedia pictures aren't a hoax there may have been something there, but its needs expert dating and research IMO. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bosnian_pyramids
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Postby sandra » Wed Mar 03, 2010 12:32 am

Aquatank wrote:The Turkey site is 11500BP (origin of thread)


:shock: Thats unreal comparing to some of the examples you gave (which I always appreciate).


Aquatank wrote:Well I know they circles they dug were ritual, every had the same amount dug out of it but not always to the same depth. My own hypothesis is that this ritual was originally defensive a form of protection against Mammoth and Mastadon herds (elephants can't fall very far or they break their legs, so dicthes were dug to prevent their passage) , and later came to have magickal-religious-symbolic meaning of a 'circle of protection'. By the time we get to the Dresden sites, the need for the physical protection is gone as was its original reason for being so oly the ritual unexplained for perhaps several millenia remained. Atleast thats what I personally think.


That makes alot of sense, I'll do a little of my own research as well, you always help give me a better picture of how to go about that. Good insight...I'd like to learn more about some of these places, knowing the history of temples and such, can't hurt.
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Postby Aquatank » Wed Mar 03, 2010 8:47 am

Sandra
Get this at the local library or get it through inter library loans.
The Civilization of the Goddess -Marija Gimbutas 1991.

Its got plenty of good pictures of neolithic artifacts from Old Europe, I've always found it amusing/fascinating to see childrens toys haven't changed much in size or design. They have a toy farm with barn in the book about the size of fisherprice or playmobil, and when I was at the Louvre I saw ancient Greek "action figures" for lack of bertter description.

Part of the reason I like looking into Old Europe is because too much History programming and Books focuses on the middle east of the period and totally ignores old Europe as if its people were just animal like foragers and not worth the effort. In my opinion thats as bad as ignoring Pre-Columbian history of North America. We lose too much information through such prejudices. I'm truly amazed by the amount of cultural data that has escaped erasure and only changed slightly into something else (The real history of Santa Claus is interesting example which may date back to 50000BP. See Santa Claus, Last of the Wild Men: The Origins and Evolution of Saint Nicholas, Spanning 50,000 Yearsby Phyllis Siefker I did note some descrepencies in the text which with a little research clears things up a bit.)
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Postby rath » Wed Mar 24, 2010 11:06 pm

This is just one of the many things out there yet to be found.

Oneday the mid east will find peace & just think of all the places yet to be found out there.

As places like Turkey .... Iraq ... Iran ... Jordon .... ect ect become more open & allow fredom of movement we will find out much more About the Civilizations from that part of the world, lost citys & tamples of Babylon, Syria & Mesopotamia, for a start.

Only time will tell.
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Postby Aquatank » Fri Mar 26, 2010 7:28 am

As I was pointing out, there are plenty of more important finds outside the Middleast. How can I say this? The Sumerians etc date from about 8000BP but all the continents (except Antartica) have been settled since 30000BP to 75000BP which pretty much means everywhere is just as important as the Middleeast. Just about same level tech for everyone until aboout 10000BP to 12000BP. Its just a matter of what there is to work with. The Middleeast has an advantage of being in stone, other places often used wood like most houses today are built of, are we less important because we use wood and cities used brick, steel, and concrete. Of course not, same applies in the past.
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