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Australia ships convicts back to Britain

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Postby rath » Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:36 am

January 02, 2010.

Outraged Brits say keep ex-criminals

- Uk outrage over deportation of crims
- UK wants Australia to keep ex-criminals
- Fears they will re-offend back in the UK


TWO hundred years ago its worst citizens were transported to the other side of the world, creating Australia in the process - now cash-strapped Britain wants its former colony to again keep its criminals.

In the past 12 months, dozens of British-born paedophiles, rapists and career criminals - many aged in their late 50s and 60s - were deported to the UK after finishing their sentences in Australian jails, despite having lived most of their lives here.

Among them was notorious paedophile Raymond Horne, who had to be given a police escort through Heathrow Airport amid British outrage over his forced return from Queensland.

UK campaigners fear that a lack of connection to their former homeland, including no support base of family and friends, makes the serial offenders more likely to reoffend.

A British Government report revealed it costs an estimated $100,000 a year to watch and house each deported "foreign" individual.


Now a number of high-profile and influential welfare groups and charities are set to mount a campaign to have laws changed. Privately many British MPs agree and a parliamentary debate on the issue is expected soon.

Australia last year jettisoned more than 60 criminals to countries of origin, mostly the UK and New Zealand.

UK child welfare campaigner Shy Keenan said while offenders had court-backed restrictions in Australia that would have them back behind bars if breached, once they were deported to the UK the ability to restrict their actions was limited.

She called on British Prime Minister Gordon Brown to raise the issue with his Australian counterpart Kevin Rudd.

"It's just not fair, Australia," she said. "In law they do belong here, in essence they are British citizens, but whether they are morally or ethically British is another argument.

"In law Australia has now found a way to kick them back to us.

"They will be assessed when they come here to Britain and made to sign the Sex Offenders Register but beyond that there is very little they can do. The slate is effectively wiped clean."

UK child protection agency Lucy Faithfull Foundation said it made no sense to send someone to the UK if they had no connection other than legally.

Tory MPs Philip Davies and Andrew Rosindell said it was lamentable Australia could jettison criminals while under UK law it couldn't do the same.
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Postby rath » Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:40 am

2009

British Fury over 77-crime killer rapist Simon Wilson

BRITISH authorities are outraged that Australia deported a murderer and depraved serial rapist who carried out a brutal sex attack only weeks after he arrived in London.

Simon Wilson, 50, has pleaded guilty to attacking a 71-year-old woman.

Wilson had spent almost all his life in Australia, where he committed 77 offences including six rapes and a savage killing.

Because he was born in Britain he was sent back there, only to continue his vicious crime spree against vulnerable women.

The case has raised further concerns about the surveillance provided for dangerous convicted criminals deported to Britain.

Police said they did not have the resources to keep people such as Wilson under 24-hour surveillance.

Tory MP Andrew Rosindell said it raised questions about ``whether we should deport people like this. At least the Australian government look after their own national interest.''

The Wilson case comes after convicted child sex offender Raymond Horne, 61, was returned to Britain even though he arrived in Australia as a five-year-old.

In this latest incident, Wilson served 16 years in a Queensland jail for the murder of a woman - but upon his release was deported as part of Australia's tough policy on foreigners who abuse their residency.

Soon after returning to London, the sex offender attacked a 71-year-old woman on her doorstep, slashing her across the face and body as he tried to rape her.

British police said the crime could have been prevented had legislation allowed London police to force Wilson to sign the sex offenders register for any murder that was committed outside the UK.

Australian detective Sergeant Dennis Hansen said he was horrified by the latest attack.

``I'm appalled that he was let loose into the community after a judge had sent him to prison for life,'' he said. ``I don't think he should ever have been allowed to return to society.''

Wilson was initially sentenced to life but it was reduced on appeal.

Wilson pleaded guilty last week in a London court to his latest crime. He spoke in a broad Australian accent.

Prosecutor Constance Briscoe told the magistrate he should never be released.

She said: ``We will certainly be making submissions at sentence that this defendant is highly dangerous and ought not to be released in the future.''

Wilson is among a string of recent cases where Australian authorities have sent back British-born criminals.

Child sex offender Robert Excell, 66, was returned to England after spending 37 years in jail in Australia.
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Postby rath » Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:46 am

December 7, 2009

Deported, ill ... and dead days later


ANDREW Derek Moore arrived from Scotland aged 11. Almost 30 years and a string of convictions later, Australia decided he had failed its character test and cancelled his visa.

He was sent "home" on October 20, leaving behind a teenage son and his extended family. Two days later he was found lying dead on a footpath. British police are asking why, and the Australian Government is denying any responsibility.

Moore's death has shone a spotlight on this country's practice of washing its hands of up to 70 people a year who are Australian in all but citizenship — and often seriously unwell.

Moore was a 43-year-old recovering alcoholic. Released at Heathrow Airport at 6am, he had $1000 cash, medication and a hotel booking. Unlike the tragic cases of Cornelia Rau and Vivian Alvarez Solon, he has attracted little sympathy because he was a convicted criminal.

Knowledge of Moore's death has spread among critics of migration policy, who see it as the most shocking example yet of heartless deportation.

Peshawa Shalley, a staff member at London's Central Park Hotel, said Moore checked out after a couple of days despite his ground-floor room being booked for a month.

The Metropolitan Police said they were called to a block of flats 15 kilometres away in South Lambeth Road on October 23, where a seriously injured man was lying on the footpath outside.

Moore was pronounced dead soon after arriving at hospital. A post-mortem examination was inconclusive. The death is being treated as unexplained and detectives are investigating it, a New Scotland Yard spokesman said.

Moore was no angel. His problems with alcohol and the law began at the age of 14 and culminated in a conviction for manslaughter after he stabbed a drinking companion in a drunken brawl in 2000.

But his son, his parents, his siblings, nieces and nephews and ex-wife all fought to keep him in Australia, promising to support him if released. Moore's family have so far declined to comment on his death.

He was the subject of a talkback radio campaign in Melbourne before his deportation, when 3AW host Derryn Hinch said it was a "cynical, sick joke on the Australian public" that he had been allowed a TV set and a DVD player at Maribyrnong detention centre after escaping in May and turning himself in four months later.

He was being "treated like a VIP", said Hinch, and was left to "swan around in a blue bathrobe and treat the place like his own Ritz-Carlton".

A source familiar with Moore's case said he was wearing a dressing gown because he was chronically ill.

"His face was like a skull," the source said, his body racked by a failing liver, hepatitis C, fibromyalgia and bowel problems. "A puff of wind would have blown him over."

The source said the centre’s operations manager later apologised to Moore for the leaks, which he considered payback for his escape.

Refugee advocate and former ABC journalist John Highfield said criminal deportees attracted little sympathy, but the policy had far-reaching consequences. "It's beyond the criminals themselves. It’s a punishment on the families as well. Andrew has a 15-year-old son who is now grieving and wanted to be with his father despite his record."

Professor Louise Newman, director of the Monash University Centre for Developmental Psychiatry and Psychology, said Moore’s death demanded a review of how the Immigration Department assesses the travel risk for deportees.

Immigration Minister Chris Evans' spokeswoman declined to comment, saying deportations were an operational matter for his department.

An Immigration Department spokesman said Moore was assessed as fit to travel by International Health and Medical Services, was provided with medication and was due for a clinical review on October 26.

Heathrow Travel Care was supposed to meet Moore on arrival but was not available.

He had a destitute allowance of $700 and a $300 cold weather clothing allowance. Moore also contacted a social services agency engaged by the Government called Prisoners Abroad.

"The department made all appropriate arrangements for his return," the department spokesman said. "The Government does not consider itself responsible for Mr Moore's untimely death and extends its condolences to his family and friends for their loss."

Senator Evans has said he is determined to deport foreign-born residents convicted of serious crimes, no matter how long they have been here.
Until 1999, anyone who had lived in Australia for more than 10 years could not be deported. The Howard government toughened the test, then the Rudd Government changed it in June, making the length of time a person has been in Australia a primary consideration.

But the University of New South Wales’ Dr Michael Grewcock, an expert in State and institutional crime, said the June changes had had no discernible effect.

Another boat carrying asylum seekers has been intercepted, the 51st this year. It was carrying 38 passengers and two crew. The interception took place about 31 nautical miles north-west of Scott Reef. The group will be taken to Christmas Island
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Postby rath » Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:56 am

Paedophile who lived in Australia for 56 years sent to UK

2008.

A serial paedophile who was deported from an Australian prison back to Britain yesterday will have to sign the sex offenders register and tell the authorities where he is living, the Home Office has said.

Raymond Horne, 61, was detained by police on arrival at Heathrow amid claims - stirred up by tabloid headlines - that he posed a severe danger to the community.

The state minister for police and corrective services in Queensland, Judy Spence, told a radio station on his departure that the state was "well rid" of him.

"He is a paedophile," she said. "He was convicted of indecent dealing against a boy under 14 years of age. If he had stayed in Queensland, we would have regarded him as someone we would have wanted to watch for the next 15 years under very close supervision."

Having emigrated from the UK at the age of five, Horne has been sent back because he never applied for Australian citizenship. But he has no immediate social or family support network in the UK. According to campaign groups working with victims of abuse, that will increase the likelihood of his reoffending.

A British child protection expert agreed that Horne's isolation in the UK might make him more likely to offend.

Paul Roffey, a director of RWA Child Protection Service, an independent agency, said: "He has already been identified as somebody who is high-risk. This is a situation that could only exacerbate that risk."

But the Home Office insisted Horne would be put on the sex offenders register and could be the subject of a sexual offences prevention order (Sopo), which can impose restrictions on, for example, how closely he can approach a school.

"Where it is known that a sex offender convicted in another country is to be deported to the UK, he is met at the port of entry by the police, who interview him and pass relevant information to the police in the area in which the offender is proposing to live," a Home Office spokeswoman said yesterday.

"Sopos not only make offenders sign on the register but also impose prohibitions - for example from being alone with children or from being within a certain distance of a playground."

Breaches of the sex offenders register or Sopos are punishable by up to five years' imprisonment. The Home Office maintains that the UK has one of the world's most robust monitoring systems, but admits that a very small proportion of those under supervision do commit serious offences.

Shy Keenan, of abuse campaign group Phoenix Chief Advocates, called for fresh legislation to control ex-prisoners on their release and the creation of an international sex offenders register. "The law needs to change to empower authorities everywhere when it comes to sex offenders," she said.

"[The police] can say to him: 'We think you're an absolute risk - but we have to wait now until you do something before we can do [anything], despite the fact that we know you're likely to do something'.

"He will probably be given contact numbers for charities that will help him with housing and food ... and a hostel - an ordinary hostel, not an offenders' hostel."

Horne's case is far from unique. In July 2005, Robert Excell was deported to Britain after spending 37 years in Australian prisons for child sex convictions dating back to 1965, when he raped a seven-year-old boy. Excell was born in the UK and emigrated to Australia when he was 10 but, like Horne, never became a citizen.

Last May it was reported that a high- risk paedophile, Keith Jamieson, was being deported to Britain following a lengthy sentence for offences on young boys despite having lived in Australia for 36 years.

Keenan estimates that for every child sex offender whose return to the UK was reported in the media, there were another 50 who received no publicity.

Britain also deports serious offenders who are not citizens at the end of their sentences. Last year the UK sent 4,200 foreign national prisoners abroad, an increase of 80% compared with the previous year. The deportation powers can even prevent convicted EU nationals from returning to this country.


A serial paedophile who was deported from an Australian prison back to Britain yesterday will have to sign the sex offenders register and tell the authorities where he is living, the Home Office has said.

Raymond Horne, 61, was detained by police on arrival at Heathrow amid claims - stirred up by tabloid headlines - that he posed a severe danger to the community.

The state minister for police and corrective services in Queensland, Judy Spence, told a radio station on his departure that the state was "well rid" of him.

"He is a paedophile," she said. "He was convicted of indecent dealing against a boy under 14 years of age. If he had stayed in Queensland, we would have regarded him as someone we would have wanted to watch for the next 15 years under very close supervision."

Having emigrated from the UK at the age of five, Horne has been sent back because he never applied for Australian citizenship. But he has no immediate social or family support network in the UK. According to campaign groups working with victims of abuse, that will increase the likelihood of his reoffending.

A British child protection expert agreed that Horne's isolation in the UK might make him more likely to offend.

Paul Roffey, a director of RWA Child Protection Service, an independent agency, said: "He has already been identified as somebody who is high-risk. This is a situation that could only exacerbate that risk."

But the Home Office insisted Horne would be put on the sex offenders register and could be the subject of a sexual offences prevention order (Sopo), which can impose restrictions on, for example, how closely he can approach a school.

"Where it is known that a sex offender convicted in another country is to be deported to the UK, he is met at the port of entry by the police, who interview him and pass relevant information to the police in the area in which the offender is proposing to live," a Home Office spokeswoman said yesterday.

"Sopos not only make offenders sign on the register but also impose prohibitions - for example from being alone with children or from being within a certain distance of a playground."

Breaches of the sex offenders register or Sopos are punishable by up to five years' imprisonment. The Home Office maintains that the UK has one of the world's most robust monitoring systems, but admits that a very small proportion of those under supervision do commit serious offences.

Shy Keenan, of abuse campaign group Phoenix Chief Advocates, called for fresh legislation to control ex-prisoners on their release and the creation of an international sex offenders register. "The law needs to change to empower authorities everywhere when it comes to sex offenders," she said.

"[The police] can say to him: 'We think you're an absolute risk - but we have to wait now until you do something before we can do [anything], despite the fact that we know you're likely to do something'.

"He will probably be given contact numbers for charities that will help him with housing and food ... and a hostel - an ordinary hostel, not an offenders' hostel."

Horne's case is far from unique. In July 2005, Robert Excell was deported to Britain after spending 37 years in Australian prisons for child sex convictions dating back to 1965, when he raped a seven-year-old boy. Excell was born in the UK and emigrated to Australia when he was 10 but, like Horne, never became a citizen.

Last May it was reported that a high- risk paedophile, Keith Jamieson, was being deported to Britain following a lengthy sentence for offences on young boys despite having lived in Australia for 36 years.

Keenan estimates that for every child sex offender whose return to the UK was reported in the media, there were another 50 who received no publicity.

Britain also deports serious offenders who are not citizens at the end of their sentences. Last year the UK sent 4,200 foreign national prisoners abroad, an increase of 80% compared with the previous year. The deportation powers can even prevent convicted EU nationals from returning to this country.
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Postby sheye » Thu Feb 04, 2010 6:26 pm

:shock: :shock: ..thankyou for posting this rath..but i must say it doesn't do much for my already threatened sense of security.

I sometimes very much regret bring children onto this world,yet I know there is goodness as well.

I'm eternally grateful to those who work to put these criminals behind bars,and they must get very frustarted with the justice system as well, when they are let out only to reoffend again....hopefully there are some who have actually changed.

I also read that many british children who were used as MK ultra victims were sent to australia....can't prove that its true ,but it does make me wonder how that plays in the whole scenerio if it is indeed true.
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Postby rath » Sat Feb 06, 2010 9:44 am

sheye wrote::shock: :shock: ..thankyou for posting this rath..but i must say it doesn't do much for my already threatened sense of security.

I also read that many british children who were used as MK ultra victims were sent to australia....can't prove that its true ,but it does make me wonder how that plays in the whole scenerio if it is indeed true.



Iv never heard of any MK cases from UK sent to Australia.

Besides I dont think it would take MK to convince the Brits to leave the UK for Australia.

But im sure MK is involved somehow when Australians leave Australia for the UK, or anywhere else for that matter.


:D :D
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rath
 
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Postby bionic » Sun Feb 07, 2010 8:56 am

Australia ships convicts back to Britain


that's ironic..and fair play..I guess..lol
Willie Wonka quotes..
What is this Wonka, some kind of funhouse?
Why? Are you having fun?
A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men.
We are the music makers, we are the dreamers of dreams
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Postby rath » Wed Feb 10, 2010 12:36 pm

bionic wrote:
Australia ships convicts back to Britain


that's ironic..and fair play..I guess..lol


True that.

& what can the UK do about it.....

Nothing.

It's not like they caprotest the action as unfair either.

Double standards an all.
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