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Cover-up of food shortage

Throughout time, there have been countless government and political conspiracies that have kept us wondering. This forum is dedicated to that very topic. Got a conspiracy theory of your own? Post it, and try to back it up as best you can!

Postby Medusa » Thu Feb 04, 2010 4:24 am

"rathIt sounds like a scam to me Medusa.


Ill take the minimum federal award any day.


the standard ( AUSTRALIAN ) Federal Minimum Wage (FMW) is $14.31 per hour.
($543.78 per week);

or $28,276.56

not bad if you work at KFC or Subway ............ ect ect.

& keep in mind, thats the Minimum Wage.

It only goes up from there.



Thats not a bad mim wage over there in the US hun................

Sadly here the min wage is even lower .................

The Government has announced the national minimum wage rate for 2009/2010 (external website). With effect from 1 October 2009, the national minimum wage adult rate (paid to workers aged 22 and over) will rise from its current level of £5.73 per hour to £5.80 per hour, an increase of 1.2%.

•What can we expect from the 2010/2011 national minimum wage increase?
This is in line with the increase recommended by the Low Pay Commission (LPC) in its 2009 report (PDF format, 5MB) (on the LPC website).

The Government has also announced that, with effect from 1 October 2009:

•the national minimum wage development rate (for workers aged 18 to 21) will rise from £4.77 per hour to £4.83 per hour (an increase of 1.3%); and
•the national minimum wage youth rate (for workers aged 16 and 17) will rise from £3.53 per hour to £3.57 per hour (an increase of 1.1%).
Additionally, the adult rate of the minimum wage will be extended to 21 year-old workers from October 2010.

As Mark Crail notes on the website of CELRE (part of the XpertHR group):

The increase is the lowest since a statutory minimum wage was introduced in April 1999, and is likely to significantly influence pay settlements across the wider economy during the final months of 2009.

LPC chairman George Bain comments:

These are very challenging times for the UK and unprecedented economic circumstances for the minimum wage. We believe that the Low Pay Commission's recommendations are appropriate for this economic climate. They reflect the need to protect low-paid workers' jobs as well as their earnings.

CBI director-general John Cridland immediately issued a supportive statement (external website), praising what he termed the latest national minimum wage increases. According to Cridland:

This moderate increase recognises that many businesses are struggling, and helps protect jobs at a time of rising unemployment. The inflation-busting rise some unions had called for would have hit firms hard and put many lower paid workers on the dole.

The increases announced today are below consumer prices index (CPI) inflation - the Government's preferred measure - which currently stands at 2.9%. But they are significantly above the rate of retail prices index (RPI) inflation, which is currently languishing in negative territory, running at -0.4% in March 2009 (subscription required).

However, latest inflation forecasts published to XpertHR show that RPI is expected to rebound quickly (subscription required), moving back into positive figures in the first quarter of 2010.

The TUC takes this account in its response to today's announcement, emphasising the need for a much higher national minimum wage increase for 2010, in order to prevent earnings growth for the lowest paid workers falling behind that for the rest of the economy. TUC general secretary Brendan Barber comments:

The LPC was right to withstand pressure from business to freeze the minimum wage. [...] But this increase is a very slender one. The LPC must be much more generous when the economy recovers next year.

As we have noted, discussions surrounding the 2009 national minimum wage decision have been heated. And this lively state of affairs looks set to continue now that the Government's decision on the 2009/2010 national minimum wage rate is known.

The CIPD, for example, argues that the decision to increase rather than freeze the national minimum wage is likely to have a negative effect on those hardest hit by the recession (external website). According to CIPD reward advisor Charles Cotton:

While we support the LPC, we are concerned that this decision will increase the risk of job losses in low paid sectors. This should have been avoided at a time when deflation on the RPI measure of inflation [would] limit the impact of a national minimum wage freeze on people's real living standards. Our greatest concern at the moment is for younger workers and job seekers.

•What can we expect from the 2010/2011 national minimum wage increase?
Tags:low paylow pay commissionlpcnational minimum wage


http://www.xperthr.co.uk/blogs/employme ... 010-3.html
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Postby rath » Fri Feb 05, 2010 9:43 am

Medusa wrote:
"rathIt sounds like a scam to me Medusa.


Ill take the minimum federal award any day.


the standard ( AUSTRALIAN ) Federal Minimum Wage (FMW) is $14.31 per hour.
($543.78 per week);

or $28,276.56

not bad if you work at KFC or Subway ............ ect ect.

& keep in mind, thats the Minimum Wage.

It only goes up from there.



Thats not a bad mim wage over there in the US hun................

Sadly here the min wage is even lower .................

The Government has announced the national minimum wage rate for 2009/2010 (external website). With effect from 1 October 2009, the national minimum wage adult rate (paid to workers aged 22 and over) will rise from its current level of £5.73 per hour to £5.80 per hour, an increase of 1.2%.



Thats not a bad mim wage over there in the US hun................


USA ......... :lol:

Try Australia.

In the USA they get paid worse then everybody, ..... I think they get like 7 Pasos a week, & a bucket of KFC.
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Postby Medusa » Sat Feb 06, 2010 5:21 am

rath wrote:USA ......... :lol:

Try Australia.

In the USA they get paid worse then everybody, ..... I think they get like 7 Pasos a week, & a bucket of KFC.




OMG I'm also blind as well and deaf now heheheheheh

Sorry hunnie xxx
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All it does is burn
It burns everything in sight
My lust for you is intense
All I do is think about you
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The way you look
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That's my lust for you.
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Postby rath » Sat Feb 06, 2010 9:40 am

:D

It's all good.
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Postby Medusa » Sat Feb 06, 2010 10:27 am

rath wrote::D

It's all good.



That's alright then hunnie lol

Can I ask where abouts you are then lov
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Postby sandra » Sat Feb 06, 2010 3:53 pm

Wow rath that really isn't a bad minimum wage there.

One of the foods Us has on you Aussies rath, is grains. We got mad grains. :mrgreen: ;)

Continuing to divert more food to fuel, as is now mandated by the US federal government in its renewable fuel standard, will likely only reinforce the disturbing rise in world hunger. By subsidising the production of ethanol to the tune of some $6bn each year, US taxpayers are in effect subsidising rising food bills at home and around the world," said Brown.

"The worst economic crisis since the great depression has recently brought food prices down from their peak, but they still remain well above their long-term average levels."

The US is by far the world's leading grain exporter, exporting more than Argentina, Australia, Canada, and Russia combined. In 2008, the UN called for a comprehensive review of biofuel production from food crops.

"There is a direct link between biofuels and food prices. The needs of the hungry must come before the needs of cars," said Meredith Alexander, biofuels campaigner at ActionAid in London. As well as the effect on food, campaigners also argue that many scientists question whether biofuels made from food crops actually save any greenhouse gas emissions.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/jan/22/quarter-us-grain-biofuels-food

Medusa, somehow missed his Australian Signature? :mrgreen: ;)
You'll come to see how much of an aussie he is. ;)
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Postby rath » Sun Feb 07, 2010 10:48 am

sandra wrote:Wow rath that really isn't a bad minimum wage there.

One of the foods Us has on you Aussies rath, is grains. We got mad grains. :mrgreen: ;)

Continuing to divert more food to fuel, as is now mandated by the US federal government in its renewable fuel standard, will likely only reinforce the disturbing rise in world hunger. By subsidising the production of ethanol to the tune of some $6bn each year


http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/jan/22/quarter-us-grain-biofuels-food

Medusa, somehow missed his Australian Signature? :mrgreen: ;)
You'll come to see how much of an aussie he is. ;)



Dont know about US grain being any better of abundant than in Australia.

I mean if US grain was better' why do they need to use it for bio-fuel.

Bio fuel is just a means of keeping the US farmers from going bust.


& thats on top of all the US farming subsidies they already get.

Australia has a very large farming & agricultural industry.

http://www.dfat.gov.au/facts/affaoverview.html


over the past several years, more and more Australia is walking away from high water relient crops.

Australia is the worlds largest exporter of coal, wool, alumina, diamonds, sheep, lead, refined zinc ores, mineral sands, bauxite.

Australia is the world's leading mineral rich resources nations.

But minerals are not the same as grains, they are not subject to the enviroment.

Floods, drought, ect ect.

however ...... Australia's awb & abb, ect ect where the largest grain producers in the world untill 2008 when the CIA & United Nations got their teath into them.

http://www.awb.com.au/growers

But the USA does produce more Soy bean & such ,,,,,,,,,

But as far as the likes of grain & beef & such goes, well the weather decides who holds that title.

Australia will hold no 1# one year & the USA wi& Canada will be down on production due to drought or snow, ect ect.

Then the next year Australia will be down on Production due to drought or flooding & the USA & Canada will have a bumper year.

The only differance is nort America has a population of some what 600 million people, while Australia has a population of 22 million people.

so right there your demestic market is much grater then ours.

So Australia relies on exports much more.
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Postby sandra » Mon Feb 08, 2010 12:11 am

rath wrote:Dont know about US grain being any better of abundant than in Australia.

I mean if US grain was better' why do they need to use it for bio-fuel.

Bio fuel is just a means of keeping the US farmers from going bust.


"Wheat is the largest crop grown globally, with approximately 223 million hectares planted annually, and Australia is the third largest exporter of wheat behind only the US and Canada. However, with grain supplies near historic lows, and global population expected to exceed 8 billion by the year 2025 (approximately a 33% increase), it is an imperative to boost productivity through environmentally sustainable methods. Nonetheless, development and commercialisation would take a number of years, as there is currently no GM wheat available in the market."


http://greenbio.checkbiotech.org/news/hexima_and_australian_centre_plant_functional_genomics_acpfg_announce_strategic_allia

rath USA to my knowledge is the largest exporter of grains, from everything I've known so far, however we are having a decline in buyers and having to look at our prices in the world market. Grain is the 4th largest crop in USA.

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2010-02-05/wheat-falls-extends-2010-decline-as-importers-avoid-u-s-grain.html

Australia is the world's leading mineral rich resources nations.

But minerals are not the same as grains, they are not subject to the enviroment.

Floods, drought, ect ect.


"It is anticipated that the work of the Minerals Down Under Flagship will facilitate the discovery of A$250 billion of new mineral resources in Australia by 2030."


http://www.csiro.au/science/Discovering-mineral-resources.html

"The minerals industry represents a large portion of Australia’s GDP and is tightly linked to our national prosperity
The future of this important industry is not assured
The Minerals Down Under Flagship is helping the Australian minerals industry to exploit new resources with an in-situ value of A$1 trillion by the year 2030, and more than double the size of the associated services and technology sector to A$10 billion per year by 2015"

http://www.csiro.au/org/Minerals-Down-Under-Overview.html


"The challenge
To secure the future of the minerals industry in Australia, we need to solve the technical challenges that will be associated with Australian operations in the future.

“Minerals Down Under will create new knowledge and transformational technologies for the mineral sector.”
Dr Peter Lilly, Director, Minerals Down Under National Research FlagshipThese include:

limited or no outcrop
greater depths of operation
higher rock stresses
increased gas levels
lower grades
scarcer human resources
globally high standards of safety and health
appropriately strict environmental and social regimes."

rath I agree with ya on Australia really making way on minerals and future prospects, however I think the environment does have something to do with the success of some of the production of mineral resources. To obtain goals like the Minerals Down Under Flagship wants to reach in future years for Australia.
“Living backwards!” Alice repeated in great
astonishment. “I never heard of such a thing!”
“—but there’s one great advantage in it, that one’s
memory works both ways.”
— Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass
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Postby sheye » Mon Feb 08, 2010 2:17 am

I agree with what you said sandra in that its no a food shortage ... But rather a food access issue


This reminds me of what is going on in Haiti
It also makes me wonder if the the military(some few) isn't secretly taking it into underground bases
I know it sounds like suspicious paranoia,but it could be possible

EDIT: I think I need to clarify that its not the whole military organization that I don' t trsut, rather the few that manipulate it for their own agendas using the hard work of the many who trust its motives, which are obvioulsy not always so pure.
Last edited by sheye on Tue Feb 09, 2010 10:02 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby sandra » Mon Feb 08, 2010 2:37 am

http://www.unu.edu/unupress/unupbooks/uu22we/uu22we00.htm#Contents


Government allocations to military, rather than social, expenditures have led to national societies characterized by limited basic skills, food insecurity, malnutrition, and ill health as well as discontent, violence, and despair (Sivard 1994; Stewart 1993; Smith 1994). Military preparedness in this way creates conflict potential and constitutes one of the underlying causes of food insecurity that can lead to war.2


That is an insert from chapter 6 Underlying Conditions.

Theres some interesting information in the book.
“Living backwards!” Alice repeated in great
astonishment. “I never heard of such a thing!”
“—but there’s one great advantage in it, that one’s
memory works both ways.”
— Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass
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