The Black Vault Message Forums

Discover the Truth!        

The War on Terrorism & Homeland Security

Army Releases November Suicide Data

Discuss the War on Terrorism, Homeland Security, Iraq, Afghanistan, North Korea and other global terrorist concerns.

Postby blackvault » Sun Dec 18, 2011 10:20 am

You don't really hear about all of this a lot in the news... but thought I'd post it here for thoughts and reactions...
------------
The Army released suicide data today for the month of November. Among active-duty soldiers, there were seven potential suicides: none have been confirmed as suicide and seven remain under investigation. For October 2011, the Army reported 17 potential suicides among active-duty soldiers. Since the release of that report, four cases have been confirmed as suicide and 13 cases remain under investigation.

During November 2011, among Reserve Component soldiers who were not on active duty, there were eight potential suicides (eight Army National Guard and no Army Reserve): two have been confirmed as suicide and six remain under investigation. For October 2011, the Army reported 12 potential suicides among not-on-active-duty soldiers. Since the release of that report, one case has been added for a total of 13 cases (five Army National Guard and eight Army Reserve). Four cases have been confirmed as suicide and nine cases remain under investigation.

As of Nov. 30, 2011, the Army has identified 260 potential soldier suicides for CY 2011. Of that total, 154 were active duty suicides: 100 have been confirmed as suicide and 54 remain under investigation; 106 were Reserve Component not on active duty suicides (73 Army National Guard and 33 Army Reserve): 84 have been confirmed as suicide and 22 remain under investigation. Compared to previous years, the Army had 305 in CY 2010 (159 active-duty and 146 not-on-active-duty) and 242 in CY 2009 (162 active-duty and 80 not-on-active-duty).

"Suicide continues to be a challenge for our Army Family," said Sgt. Maj. of the Army Raymond F. Chandler III. "It is a devastating loss when one of our own, whether soldier, civilian or family member, dies by suicide."Chandler also said that overcoming this challenge will take the Army's collective efforts, dedication, support and understanding. "To that end, I am calling on all of our leaders, but especially the noncommissioned officers, the backbone of our great Army, to make a difference. We must cultivate a climate that encourages help-seeking behaviors and supports those who ask for help," said Chandler. "By standing shoulder to shoulder, we can ensure that no one stands alone!"

Soldiers and families in need of crisis assistance can contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.Trained consultants are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year and can be contacted by dialing 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or by visiting their website at http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org .

Army leaders can access current health promotion guidance in newly revised Army Regulation 600-63 (Health Promotion) at: http://www.army.mil/usapa/epubs/pdf/r600_63.pdfand Army Pamphlet 600-24 (Health Promotion, Risk Reduction and Suicide Prevention) at http://www.army.mil/usapa/epubs/pdf/p600_24.pdf .

The Army's comprehensive list of Suicide Prevention Program information is located athttp://www.preventsuicide.army.mil .

Suicide prevention training resources for Army families can be accessed at http://www.armyg1.army.mil/hr/suicide/t ... sub_cat=20 (requires Army Knowledge Online access to download materials).
Information about Military OneSource is located at http://www.militaryonesource.com or by dialing the toll-free number 1-800-342-9647 for those residing in the continental United States. Overseas personnel should refer to the Military OneSource website for dialing instructions for their specific location.

Information about the Army's Comprehensive Soldier Fitness Program is located at http://www.army.mil/csf .

The Defense Center for Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) Outreach Center can be contacted at 1-866-966-1020, via electronic mail at Resources@DCoEOutreach.org and at http://www.dcoe.health.mil .

The website for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention is http://www.afsp.org , and the Suicide Prevention Resource Council site is found at http://www.sprc.org/index.asp .
-----
John Greenewald, Jr.
The Black Vault Website Owner / Operator
http://www.theblackvault.com
User avatar
blackvault
 
Posts: 1744
Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 4:04 pm
Location: North Hollywood, Ca.

Postby Cake » Mon Dec 19, 2011 6:08 pm

:dance: Keep dancing...Suicide of our veterans....
The problem, I think, is this. We are not speaking of our first experience with what happens to people we train and require to kill others. We know this. It is not news. Rather what must be true is that at the highest levels of our Gov't no one really cares. Recently some political types were interviewed in this regard. They said" these people signed up to do a job for a certain payment....we owe them nothing more....

This is the will of the people expressed through our elected representatives...
User avatar
Cake
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2011 5:35 pm

Postby ricardo » Tue Dec 20, 2011 2:11 am

thank you for posting mr. blackvault on such an important topic as
suicide. (an irreversible event/ result. from the rapidly evolving human condition. self inflicted collateral damage.)

my impression is , that the military Is geared for war and survival , any sign of
weakness is interpreted: for reason for expulsion. if only we had answers. mr.cake and less sound bites. you will find a more effective fighting force. I submit. paradoxically, they do care. because morale is key to winning in battles, life, or even an football game.

superior motivation is not always quantifiable.

what decompression from the battle environment is available? stigmatization
for life as an failure? drugs? alcohol? an slow suicide...
Last edited by ricardo on Tue Dec 20, 2011 2:33 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
ricardo
 
Posts: 1494
Joined: Sun Dec 11, 2011 9:10 pm

Postby ricardo » Tue Dec 20, 2011 2:26 am

every soldier that commits suicide should receive full benefits and respect as if they were killed or missing in action.

in some way. if I were an unit leader I'd be wondering how I failed to protect
the soldiers flank. how I missed , cultivating the proper motivation and
talent. unit leader :wall:
User avatar
ricardo
 
Posts: 1494
Joined: Sun Dec 11, 2011 9:10 pm

Postby Cole_Trickle » Wed Dec 28, 2011 12:54 pm

Cake wrote::dance: Keep dancing...Suicide of our veterans....
The problem, I think, is this. We are not speaking of our first experience with what happens to people we train and require to kill others. We know this. It is not news. Rather what must be true is that at the highest levels of our Gov't no one really cares. Recently some political types were interviewed in this regard. They said" these people signed up to do a job for a certain payment....we owe them nothing more....

This is the will of the people expressed through our elected representatives...



Although true, a bit too harsh in my book.......Many people have signed up in the past knowing that the chances of seeing combat were very slim. Today it's a different ballgame, it takes balls to sign up.................the rest is just made for TV BULLSHIT...........

The suicides are a direct result of US Military policy/intervention.........which is part and parcel of BIG CORP American Policy................Only a fool would ever debate this.

It takes a certain kind of person to kill as ordered ( most have a certain level of professionalism ) in that regard.............yet by comparison anyone can kill them self and no training whatsoever is ever required.

I think the trigger mechanism is the real ELEPHANT in the room.................That's the only reason why you don't see these sorts of things being dealt with in a public setting and I find that a gross miscarriage of Military honor, as well as character.

Cole
User avatar
Cole_Trickle
 
Posts: 2703
Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 11:54 am

Postby gudskepteacal » Thu Dec 29, 2011 1:32 am

The suicide rate for non-military civilians is about .0115% according to this...

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/suicide.htm

I'm using 300 million as the total population for 2008. Using 2 million as the total number of people in the military, 260 is .013% which is slightly higher than civilian population.
"History records that the money changers have used every form of abuse, intrigue, deceit, and violent means possible to maintain their control over governments by controlling money and its issuance." - James Madison
User avatar
gudskepteacal
 
Posts: 489
Joined: Fri Jun 05, 2009 1:16 am

Postby Cole_Trickle » Thu Dec 29, 2011 4:11 am

Yeah I like how they say " based on population of or per 100-k " The local area is way North of that Number and based on an average of 100,000 people.....same formula the CDC seems to like..............the local rate is at least double their numbers.

The rate itself has been in the local news 2-3 times this year...........They can skew the numbers all they want but they can't hide from public records provided by the local coroner.... ;) Unless of course the coroner isn't interested in keeping his/her job.

All you have to do is read your local paper, it's under the public record section of the paper..............cause of death clearly printed, some plain as day, some a bit more obscure but still easy to deduce.

Regardless, one suicide is one too many...........It's something that more people deal with than most of us will really ever know.

Cole
User avatar
Cole_Trickle
 
Posts: 2703
Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 11:54 am

Postby greeney2 » Thu Dec 29, 2011 10:16 am

This is the way they do a lot of statistics, my company as an example has had an ongoing water table and polution issue for our "Hill" facilty, for decades. They used figures like the ones you just used 2 per thousand is now 3, which you can ask, maybe it has nothing to do with anything, such small numbers. CDC uses those kinds of statistics, and it does have meaning. Cole is right one is one too many.

From what I have read, there is a fine line between homocide and suicide, and there has been a pattern, since Bush Sr. first gulf war, or vets coming home with PTS, and either committing suicide or murdering spouses. It also is a pattern in some of the most elite of our military. Special forces, green berets, seals, etc. You can say these numbers fit into the national average,but that would be quite ridiculous, becasue the national average is not in a combat zone, watching or participating in horrific death minute to minute. The National average is also aging from 10-90, and these guys are a tighter age group. We need to also provide coming home help to all of them, prepare them to return to normal life, not just come home to keeping it all inside. They should compare the longterm statistics from WW2, Korea, and Viet Nam concerning the PTS. We can not let our vets return home and become jobless and homeless, as many reservists lost jobs when they were reactivated. That income loss, made many loose homes, and they return to sleep in the streets many of them. No wonder many kill themselves, they gave up everything only to be stuck in the middle east trying to make life better for people who hate us.
greeney2
 
Posts: 9530
Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 11:54 am

Postby frrostedman » Fri Dec 30, 2011 8:21 pm

I saw a commercial today for the Wounded Warrior Foundation and I was kind of shocked to hear an Iraq veteran speak so candidly. He said he definitely would have committed suicide when he came home, if it hadn't been for the help of the foundation. Pretty bold thing to admit but I get it and respect him.
"But let us not come up with any patronizing nonsense about Jesus being a great teacher. He has not left that open to us. He did not intend to." C.S. Lewis
User avatar
frrostedman
 
Posts: 3707
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2009 7:01 pm

Postby Cole_Trickle » Wed Jan 04, 2012 11:22 am

Well you guys are making some really good points, especially Tom's in regard to respect :clap: It takes a bucket of guts to admit one's weakness, let alone in public...

I think there will always be a stigma attached to suicide, yet I'm not really sure why that is................I guess it's taboo to so many people, usually those with little compassion or empathy for those most affected by the pull of such things.

There was a great line in the movie Open Range...Costner's character was taking to the freighters and said something about there being things that gnaw at a man worse than dying. I think that holds true for all of us in some regard.

Being in combat has to be one of the very most stressful situations man or woman can ever face. Giving aid to those who need it as a result, seems to be the very least their country could ever give in return.

I had a friend in high school who's younger brother committed suicide. The truly sad aspect of the suicide absent the obvious affect on the immediate family, was the very sad fact that very very very few people would have ever suspected that he had any sort of issue whatsoever. On the outside he seemed completely normal, which begs a question as to what normal really is.......Who knows.

Just a very shocking, very sad end to a really good kid. I don't think everyone is immune, but surly returning troops are more vulnerable than most anyone else walking the planet.

I can't imagine dodging all those bullets only to end up taking one by your own hand..........very sad, just seems so useless to me. I hope that more vets have the courage to seek out help..............if anyone deserves it surely they do.

Cole
User avatar
Cole_Trickle
 
Posts: 2703
Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 11:54 am

Next

Return to The War on Terrorism & Homeland Security

cron
  • View new posts
  • View unanswered posts
  • Who is online
  • In total there is 1 user online :: 0 registered, 0 hidden and 1 guest (based on users active over the past 10 minutes)
  • Most users ever online was 292 on Mon Apr 23, 2012 3:19 pm
  • Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest