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Honeybees Colony Collapse Disorder

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Postby Aquatank » Tue Sep 07, 2010 7:36 am

The number of photos I've taken of bees is rather small, some are really too blury because its so close and they are moving fast and won't stay still coupled with the autofocus lag time its annoying. And like I said some are camera shy, after all theres this giant human inches away. I've tried to photo squirrels too, but they never get close enough, besides the blacks are dissappearing and I havent seen albinos in almost 10 years. Probably because the number of cats and hawks has increased around here.
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Postby sandra » Tue Sep 07, 2010 7:48 am

Yeah I imagine they are camera shy. hehe
But I see all kinds of black, red, and albino squirrels up north in
Minnesota here. There used to be a squirrel that passed through my yard
on a daily basis that had cheeks that almost drug on the ground. I could
never figure it out, there was no way it was food he was carrying. His
cheeks were massive, very unusual looking, wish I would have taken a picture.
He was just soo cute, and he moved a bit slower.

Up north we even have to worry about the eagles taking small dogs.
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Postby Aquatank » Thu Oct 07, 2010 6:10 am

The suspect problem is now a one two three punch
The already suspect fungus: Nosema ceranae
the virus: Insect Iridescent Virus (IIV) possibly IIV-6 or IIV-24
and using mites as the introduction vector.

http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi ... ne.0013181

Mite Control might be achieved by small cell honeybees since apparently bigger bees don't equal more honey.
http://www.beesource.com/point-of-view/ ... e-control/
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Postby mrmonsoon » Mon Oct 11, 2010 10:52 am

I have read an article about this.

It claimed that the the small satellite dishes are whats taking out the bee's.
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Postby chiselray » Thu Nov 11, 2010 7:41 am

i think its the virus..

but dont worry australia has plenty..
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Postby chiselray » Sun Dec 12, 2010 3:54 am

how are the bees going..doesnt anyone care ?
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Postby sandra » Tue Dec 21, 2010 11:25 pm

:lol:

Here is the lastest December 2010 usda ccd progress report.
http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/br/ccd/ccdpr ... rt2010.pdf
Looks pretty long winded but I plan to read through it to see
if there is any new information available. Haven't kept up
to date with whats been happening with this as
much as I would like to.
“Living backwards!” Alice repeated in great
astonishment. “I never heard of such a thing!”
“—but there’s one great advantage in it, that one’s
memory works both ways.”
— Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass
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Postby sandra » Wed Jan 19, 2011 11:18 pm

Exclusive: Bees facing a poisoned spring


"A new generation of pesticides is making honeybees far more susceptible to disease, even at tiny doses, and may be a clue to the mysterious colony collapse disorder that has devastated bees across the world, the US government's leading bee researcher has found. Yet the discovery has remained unpublished for nearly two years since it was made by the US Department of Agriculture's Bee Research Laboratory.

The release of such a finding from the American government's own bee lab would put a major question mark over the use of neonicotinoid insecticides – relatively new compounds which mimic the insect-killing properties of nicotine, and which are increasingly used on crops in the US, Britain and around the world.

Bayer, the German chemicals giant which developed the insecticides and makes most of them, insists that they are safe for bees if used properly, but they have already been widely linked to bee mortality. The US findings raise questions about the substance used in the bee lab's experiment, imidacloprid, which was Bayer's top-selling insecticide in 2009, earning the company £510m. The worry is that neonicotinoids, which are neurotoxins – that is, they attack the central nervous system – are also "systemic", meaning they are taken up into every part of the plant which is treated with them, including the pollen and nectar. This means that bees and other pollinating insects can absorb them and carry them back to their hives or nests – even if they are not the insecticide's target species."

http://www.independent.co.uk/environmen ... 89267.html
“Living backwards!” Alice repeated in great
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