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Atlantis

Here, you can discuss the Mayans, Atlantis, the Aztecs and other ancient and lost civilizations.

Who lived in Atlantis?

Humans.
2
50%
Humans and aliens that evolved in outer space.
0
No votes
Humans and aliens that evolved here on earth.
0
No votes
Aliens.
2
50%
 
Total votes : 4

Postby Aethra » Sun Mar 28, 2010 10:08 pm

Hello,

I have a theory about aliens which I wrote about in another post. Basically it says that humans were apes who became relatively aquatic for a period of time (aquatic ape thoery), and that aliens (greys) are the ones who stayed in the water for a longer period, eventually coming back to the land although possibly staying underground/underwater in some places indefinately. Their race would have continued to develop or evolve in the water which would give them the lack of hair but also intelligence, and not only intelligence, but this could possibly explain their inherent psychic abilities. Just the way dolphins can attack humans with sonic waves (they are also mammals who went back to the water and developed similarly) the neotanous stage that they are continually in, to me, suggests that their brains may not fully 'develop' the way ours do, and consequently their ability to retain any psychic ability, intuitiveness, and creativity, as well as the ability to absorb new information and ways of doing things, could extend beyond childhood, into adulthood.

My theory about Atlantis is that it was like a meeting place between humans and the 'aliens', their aquatic cousins. The key here would be that it was not the stars that were as important as the water aspect of Atlantis. Although that would be where they taught humans many things, and how the ancient cultures had so much knowledge of the stars and building with stone, it seems to me more a meeting place between earth and ocean.

Ideally, I'd like to think we could bring back the idea of Atlantis, and incorporate water more into our lives through waterfalls and such. I think we've forgotten how vital it is not only to our survival, but our evolution as well.
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Postby sandra » Sun Mar 28, 2010 10:25 pm

Aethra wrote:
Ideally, I'd like to think we could bring back the idea of Atlantis, and incorporate water more into our lives through waterfalls and such. I think we've forgotten how vital it is not only to our survival, but our evolution as well.


First, I enjoyed reading everything you had to say, very interesting theory, and I love thinking about water, being around water, and just anything with water....and you make a good point, I believe as well, people need to reconnect with the elements, especially water.

I've got no background information on the Aquatic ape theory, but it sounds absolutely fascinating along with the rest! Welcome to the Blackvault Aethra. :D

Pretty much it seems like you think we've come from the bottom up in a sense?
“Living backwards!” Alice repeated in great
astonishment. “I never heard of such a thing!”
“—but there’s one great advantage in it, that one’s
memory works both ways.”
— Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass
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Postby Aethra » Sun Mar 28, 2010 11:15 pm

Thank you very much for your warm welcome.

From the bottom up? From the bottom of the ocean up? Or under the Earth? I think our ancestors might have lived in caves near the ocean, and some went up and some went down, into the water, or earth, that is until they learned to fly and maybe even leave Earth altogether.

I really don't know...

I'm happy to hear you share the same love of water. My secret name for humans and alternately aliens is 'Water Babies' :lol: . There is not one single element that seems to impart so much natural understanding and beauty as water.
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Postby sandra » Mon Mar 29, 2010 1:28 am

Aethra wrote:
From the bottom up? From the bottom of the ocean up? Or under the Earth? I think our ancestors might have lived in caves near the ocean, and some went up and some went down, into the water, or earth, that is until they learned to fly and maybe even leave Earth altogether.

Well I also believe in deep earth sprits, water spirits as well, along with the rest.
So it kind of made sense how you explained that, there are ones in between just as well.


I'm happy to hear you share the same love of water. My secret name for humans and alternately aliens is 'Water Babies' :lol: . There is not one single element that seems to impart so much natural understanding and beauty as water.

Loved how you worded that, natural...if anything is natural, it would have to be water.
Ever notice peoples fear of water? Of not being able to see whats beneath or around them? ;) What I understand is, we can be just as much water, as water is.
Life, everlasting life.
“Living backwards!” Alice repeated in great
astonishment. “I never heard of such a thing!”
“—but there’s one great advantage in it, that one’s
memory works both ways.”
— Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass
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Postby Aethra » Mon Mar 29, 2010 2:34 am

sandra wrote:Well I also believe in deep earth sprits, water spirits as well, along with the rest.
So it kind of made sense how you explained that, there are ones in between just as well.

Loved how you worded that, natural...if anything is natural, it would have to be water.
Ever notice peoples fear of water? Of not being able to see whats beneath or around them? ;) What I understand is, we can be just as much water, as water is.


Yes, when I look into peoples eyes I feel that, the depth and endlessness at its center, sort of like looking into the mystery of the vast ocean or life itself, where we see and absorb yet aren't completely aware of how we came to be, how we got here, or the mysteries and dangers that surround us everyday.

Have you heard of the Chinese concept of "Li"?

"The tao is a certain kind of order, and this kind of order is not quite what we call order when we arrange everything geometrically in boxes, or in rows. That is a very crude kind of order, but when you look at a plant it is perfectly obvious that the plant has order. We recognize at once that is not a mess, but it is not symmetrical and it is not geometrical looking. The plant looks like a Chinese drawing, because they appreciated this kind of non-symmetrical order so much that it became an integral aspect of their painting. In the Chinese language this is called li, and the character for li means the markings in jade. It also means the grain in wood and the fiber in muscle. We could say, too, that clouds have li, marble has li, the human body has li. We all recognize it, and the artist copies it whether he is a landscape painter, a portrait painter, an abstract painter, or a non-objective painter. They all are trying to express the essence of li. The interesting thing is, that although we all know what it is, there is no way of defining it. Because tao is the course, we can also call li the watercourse, and the patterns of li are also the patterns of flowing water. We see those patterns of flow memorialized, as it were, as sculpture in the grain in wood, which is the flow of sap, in marble, in bones, in muscles. All these things are patterned according to the basic principles of flow. In the patterns of flowing water you will all kind of motifs from Chinese art, immediately recognizable, including the S-curve in the circle of yang-yin. So li means then the order of flow, the wonderful dancing pattern of liquid, because Lao-tzu likens tao to water: The great tao flows everywhere, to the left and to the right, It loves and nourishes all things, but does not lord it over them."


Life, everlasting life.


Yes, here's an interesting bit for you: "The jellyfish of Turritopsis nutricula has the capability to be immortal, able to revert to the polyp phase of its life cycle under adverse conditions."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jellyfish

An article:
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/disco ... jellyfish/

Also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axolotl

"The feature of the salamander that attracts most attention is its healing ability: the axolotl does not heal by scarring and is capable of the regeneration of entire lost appendages in a period of months, and, in certain cases, more vital structures. Some have indeed been found restoring the less vital parts of their brains. They can also readily accept transplants from other individuals, including eyes and parts of the brain—restoring these alien organs to full functionality. In some cases, axolotls have been known to repair a damaged limb as well as regenerating an additional one, ending up with an extra appendage that makes them attractive to pet owners as a novelty. In metamorphosed individuals, however, the ability to regenerate is greatly diminished. The axolotl is therefore used as a model for the development of limbs in vertebrates."
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Postby Aquatank » Mon Mar 29, 2010 6:53 pm

Aethra
IMO Atlantis did not exist and its a fiction created by Plato for philosophical debate. I will admit he was inspired by several real life events in different locales, but thats it. Looked for that choice on the poll but it wasn't there. :)

Sandra
The Aquatic Ape hypothesis is from the 1960s and 1970s. Its not altogether wrong, but it is problematic in that there is a lack of fossil evidence, so it needs proving entirely right. I've heard the scientific community often dismisses it because it cause problems with the accepted human family tree, but some scientists are looking at it more, As I pointed out awhile back we've got Woman X in the mix now, and we'll eventually find other things that don't quite fit.
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Postby Aethra » Mon Mar 29, 2010 7:36 pm

You only get to pick from the ones listed. :P

I don't know if Atlantis ever existed but if it didn't, how do all the ancient cultures share so many similarites? Maybe they were able to travel around more than we know?

I like your name... "Aquatank." :)
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Postby Aquatank » Mon Mar 29, 2010 7:51 pm

I can answer how they were similar quite readily. IF we accept Atlantis' existence hypothetically, then its placed at 12000BP (according to Plato), now we know most of the world is settled by humans by atleast 30000BP. The next part is cultural diffusion: trade in goods, stories, and ideas. So there is a possibility of large amount of cultural diffusion taking place over the intervening 18000. Think about the amount of diffusion which has happened in just the last 400 years and move forward another 17600 and you'll understand what I mean.

I earned my name in college. :twisted: :lol: :D
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Postby sandra » Tue Mar 30, 2010 10:25 pm

Aethra wrote:
sandra wrote:Yes, here's an interesting bit for you: "The jellyfish of Turritopsis nutricula has the capability to be immortal, able to revert to the polyp phase of its life cycle under adverse conditions."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jellyfish

An article:
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/disco ... jellyfish/

Also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axolotl

"The feature of the salamander that attracts most attention is its healing ability: the axolotl does not heal by scarring and is capable of the regeneration of entire lost appendages in a period of months, and, in certain cases, more vital structures. Some have indeed been found restoring the less vital parts of their brains. They can also readily accept transplants from other individuals, including eyes and parts of the brain—restoring these alien organs to full functionality. In some cases, axolotls have been known to repair a damaged limb as well as regenerating an additional one, ending up with an extra appendage that makes them attractive to pet owners as a novelty. In metamorphosed individuals, however, the ability to regenerate is greatly diminished. The axolotl is therefore used as a model for the development of limbs in vertebrates."


Yeah I have heard that of the jellyfish and salamander, and with transdifferentiation, there is scientific evidence of cells switchin/morphing of the human oesophagus, which is interesting, because this supposedly happens when there is damage done to the oesophagus at times by a poisoness substance called lye which is some pretty nasty stuff that is used in many consumer products. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lye and associated with cancer. Now when I consider some of these relations I also look at the placement of the human body in which this transdifferentiation is said to take place.
And its interesting that Jellyfish are being found in various places with a range in tentacles, maybe like that of humans with different levels of dna activated yet scientifically unknown.

And I do not believe that these transformations are limited to physical evidence of such things of course. Isn't it interesting that jellyfish first meet their sexual maturity.
As far as I'm concerned humans have been doing these things, its just not often times scientifically backed up. And the transdifferentiation that is noted, is in the oesophagus which is at a beginning of anything incoming to the physical body, which I would also relate to that of the spiritual body. Not only that, I would relate that to the entrance of alot of things.

But could you imagine someone losing a limb like a salamander and seeing it grow bacK?
“Living backwards!” Alice repeated in great
astonishment. “I never heard of such a thing!”
“—but there’s one great advantage in it, that one’s
memory works both ways.”
— Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass
User avatar
sandra
 
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Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 6:27 pm
Location: Minnesota US

Postby sandra » Tue Mar 30, 2010 10:28 pm

Aquatank wrote:
Sandra
The Aquatic Ape hypothesis is from the 1960s and 1970s. Its not altogether wrong, but it is problematic in that there is a lack of fossil evidence, so it needs proving entirely right. I've heard the scientific community often dismisses it because it cause problems with the accepted human family tree, but some scientists are looking at it more, As I pointed out awhile back we've got Woman X in the mix now, and we'll eventually find other things that don't quite fit.


Oh so its fairly a new hypothesis, where did some of the ideas previously come from I wonder? Thanks for the information I'd like to do some more reading into it, can't hurt anything.
And if you hear anymore about the Woman X before I do, sure hope you post it, I really want to know the first findings that come from it.
“Living backwards!” Alice repeated in great
astonishment. “I never heard of such a thing!”
“—but there’s one great advantage in it, that one’s
memory works both ways.”
— Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass
User avatar
sandra
 
Posts: 3702
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 6:27 pm
Location: Minnesota US

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