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Australians have the world's largest houses

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Postby rath » Sun Nov 29, 2009 10:21 am

November 30, 2009 12:00am

AUSTRALIANS have the world's largest houses, again beating the United States, however the cost of renting is similarly expanding.

Data commissioned by CommSec shows the Australian house has grown on average by 10 per cent in the past decade to a record high of 214sq m, three times the size of the average British house.


But a second report from BIS Shrapnel has also forecast rents would continue to spiral with a rise of 5 per cent a year in Brisbane between 2010 and 2012 and similar levels in other capitals.

It was estimated landlords would pocket an extra $2 billion nationally during the period.

According to CommSec, while the houses are getting bigger, so too are the families with the number of people in each household rising from 2.51 to 2.56, the first such rise in at least 100 years.

NSW has the biggest houses in Australia and by a large margin. The size of the average new house built in NSW in 2008-09 was 262.9sq m, followed by Queensland 253sq m.

"The increase in the size of the average family unit may mean that fewer new homes need to be built," CommSec's Craig James said.

"It makes sense. Population is rising, as is the cost of housing and the cost of moving house, so we are making greater use of what we've got.

"Children are living at home longer with parents and more people are opting for shared accommodation."

Had the number of persons per household remained unchanged, CommSec estimates that 166,000 extra homes would needed to have been built in the 2007-08 year.

"If the size of the average household continues to rise, there will be reduced demand for new houses and apartments," Mr James said.

"It is questionable whether Aussie homes can, or indeed should, continue to grow.

"Generation Y is already baulking at the cost of housing, choosing to stay at home longer with parents."

In Europe Denmark has the biggest homes (houses and flats), with an average floor area of 137sq m, followed by Greece (126sq m), and the Netherlands (115.5sq m).

Homes in the UK are the smallest in Europe at 76sq m.

Bargain hunters snap up sand castles

The news came as a Sovereign Islands mansion was snapped up at auction for $9 million, the latest in a string of Gold Coast "sand castles" to sell at a hefty discount as cashed-up bargain hunters hit the luxury market.

The waterfront property – which occupies two blocks in arguably the Glitter Strip's ritziest suburb and which boasts six bedrooms, 10 bathrooms, a 15-seat cinema and a 12-car garage – had been for sale for $12.95 million after being passed in at auction earlier this year.

But the owner, Gold Coast developer Scott Widdicombe, accepted the reduced offer from a mystery local buyer when the home went under the hammer on Saturday.

Despite being a relative bargain, the price is among the highest paid on the Sovereign Islands – a man-made island enclave off Paradise Point, overlooking the Southport Broadwater. The estate boasts some of Australia's most expensive real estate and has been home to the likes of motor racing legend Dick Johnson and former beer baron Bernie Power.

The Sovereign Islands sale follows that last week of fallen IT tycoon Daniel Tzvetkoff's unfinished mega-mansion on the Gold Coast's "Millionaires Row", Hedges Ave at Mermaid Beach, for $17 million – $10 million less than he paid for it just 17 months earlier.

In September, embattled surfwear retailer Rod Galt's beachfront mansion, also on Hedges Ave, sold for $9.5 million. It was just over half of what the former Carlton AFL player bought the property for from Gold Coast identity Ken Lacey in March last year.

Property agent David Vertullo, who sold the Sovereign Islands mansion, said confidence was returning to the top end of the market.

In Brisbane, 17 properties listed for auction on Saturday sold for a total of $8.3 million.

This represented a 54 per cent clearance rate, compared with 22 per cent for the same time last year.
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Postby greeney2 » Sat Dec 05, 2009 1:14 am

There are a lot of things to consider in those specifications rath. In Austrailia, when you figure out square footage(meters to your system), how do you calculate that? Is it strictly the area of the house you actually live in, not including garages, basments or attics?

Houses in the USA are built differently in separate parts of the country. Most homes in the east or Midwest, are built with raised floor foundations, and many have full basements under the house that serves for many utility uses, like storage, funaces, cloths washing rooms, or fix it shop. Some people convert basement into finished rooms, but usually they are just concrete floors and walls. Similarly attics are used for a lot of storage, which allows the living space of homes to be much smaller. also in cold winter areas, the size of homes is considered carfully becasue of the utilities to heat them in winter. Out in sunny California, we build much diferently. Nearly everyhome is what they call slab foundation, which is a full concrete slab that the house is built upon, having no basement for utility use. Its a cheaper way to build, and lets homes be made quite large. With earthquakes and our kind of soil, raised foundations with full basments are almost never built. consquently homes here, never have full walkin kinds of attics, like back east. A typical attic in the east usually is the size of the house footprint which can allow for 1000 or more sq feet of use to store things. However in the west with our heat, attics just would be so hot inside, they would be useless, so our attic is usually only 4ft tall, and what they call a crawl space, to allow for insulation, venting, and ducting work. What I'm getting at is a 2000 sq foot house isn;t that big when you do not have an extra attic or basement like a 2000 sq foot house in the east might have. That would allow you about 1000 sq ft of basement for utility use, and another 1000 in the attic, so you effectively have more like 4000 sq ft. Most garages in the west are at least 2 car garages, which many people use like a basement or attic, and end up parking cars outside all the time. I've lived in my house since 1975 and never had a car in my garage.

I'm not sure what the climate in Austrailia is like but it probably commands how homes are built and how big they end up. Bottom line no matter what it is, you can build a cheap home or you can spare no expense. I learned when I built an addition that the money in building is in 3 places. The kitchen and how much you want to spend. The bathrooms and how much you want to spend. The third thing is the quality of windows and doors can range from bottom line to 10 times that amount. You can build a bathroom with bare bones white sink, tub and toilet, or you can spend what ever your creative side wants. The more you add the higher per sq ft. it ends up. The same size home can vary from $ 50 sq. ft to $250 with no problem. Cost of land also determains what you are going to build. You can find real big homes built on postage stamp lots in California. You can spent $1M on a home and be so close to neighbors, you may as well be in an apartment.
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Postby rath » Wed Dec 09, 2009 10:35 am

greeney2 wrote:There are a lot of things to consider in those specifications rath. In Austrailia, when you figure out square footage(meters to your system), how do you calculate that? Is it strictly the area of the house you actually live in, not including garages, basments or attics?



I hear what your saying however, to answer your question.

Yes it is just the floor area of a new FREE STANDING HOUSE.

Free standing as in the for outside walls that hold up the house.

No basements, attics, Sheds or car ports.



The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data commissioned by CommSec also showed the average floor area of new free-standing houses was also at a record high - 245.3sqm.


here is another article about it, that might help.

I will however point out that you are looking at this as a typical AMERICAN.

A little prudish.

This post is not meant to be a case of who is better.

Quite the opposite, in fact.

Rather than read the article as an American.

Try & read it as a person.

Australians have the world's largest houses

nowhere in the news article did i see anybody say this was a good thing for Australian's or anybody for that fact.

An Australian media company like Fox News ( news corporation ) Saying

Australian's have the world's largest houses


Is just as offensive as saying Australians are as fat & stupid as American's

or that Australian's smell worse than the French.

Or are as ugly as the English.


Australia is a desert continent, hot & dry.

I think its safe to bet Australia is not very likely to host, the winter Olympics any time soon.

In the northern hemisphere you might like your winters with all your snow & ice, hot soup & coco, but do you know what it costs to keep an Australian house cool.

& lets not forget the impact of bigger homes on the climate change debate.


http://www.envirotech-online.com/news/e ... data/7504/

AAP

New research shows that Australia has overtaken the United States to have the largest homes in the world.

While average US home sizes have shrunk for the first time in a decade due to global recession, the average floor space of new Australian homes hit a record high of 214.6 square metres in 2008/09 financial year, according to official data.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data commissioned by CommSec also showed the average floor area of new free-standing houses was also at a record high - 245.3sqm.

By contrast, the average size of new homes started in the US in the September quarter stood at 201.5sqm.

CommSec chief economist Craig James said the latest figures helped to explain how Australians were dealing with the shortage of housing - by making greater use of bigger homes.

"It is commonly believed that there is a housing shortage in Australia, we aren't building enough homes to accommodate our growing population," Mr James said in a statement.

"In fact, industry bodies believe that we are under-building by 50,000 homes a year. But the figures on home size and housing utilisation raise doubts about the extent of under-building in Australia."

ABS data showed that the average size of Australian households rose in the year to June 2008, from 2.51 people per home to 2.56 people.

"At face value, the increase in household size ... may not seem remarkable, but it appears to be the first increase in at least a century and perhaps the first since European settlement," Mr James said.

"It makes sense. Population is rising, as is the cost of housing and the cost of moving house, so we are making greater use of what we've got.

"Children are living at home longer with parents and more people are opting for shared accommodation."

The research showed homes in other parts of the world are far smaller.

Data from Europe shows that Denmark has the biggest homes (houses and flats) with an average floor area of 137 sqm, followed by Greece (126 sqm), and the Netherlands (115.5 sqm).

Homes in the UK are the smallest in Europe, at 76 sqm on average.

© 2009 AAP



CLIMATE change is steaming ahead with each decade warmer than the last, the Bureau of Meteorology says.

Next year is tipped to be the hottest yet.

A wrap-up of the global climate for 2009, released at the Copenhagen climate conference, showed this year was the fifth-warmest on record. Temperatures were 0.44C above average.

"The decade 2000-2009 is very likely to be the warmest on record," said World Meteorological Organisation secretary-general Michel Jarraud.

Head of climate analysis at the Bureau of Meteorology Dr David Jones said the data should silence climate sceptics.

"Clearly climate change hasn't stopped, global warming hasn't stopped," he said. "The planet is continuing to warm - and it's warming in our back yard."

Climate services manager Darren Ray said 2009 was shaping up to be the state's hottest yet.

is likely to compound the global warming effect. nteUsing satellite images, Australian Antarctic Division glaciologist Neal Young spotted a giant iceberg drifting from Antarctica towards Western Australia.

He said the 140sq km iceberg, B17B, was 19km long by 8km wide. "As the water warms up, the iceberg is slowly breaking up, resulting in hundreds of more smaller icebergs in the area," he said.

Meanwhile, Prime Minister Kevin Rudd has distanced himself from a proposed climate change deal in Copenhagen, despite Australia being one of the countries involved in its drafting.

The deal would mean developing nations would restrict emissions to an even greater degree on a per-capita basis.

But it would also mean Australia's promise of an unconditional cut of 5 per cent on year 2000 levels would be at least tripled to 15 per cent, and could see Australia forced into achieving a 25 per cent cut by 2020.
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