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False claims of clergy abuse clarified

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Postby greeney2 » Fri Feb 10, 2012 12:15 pm

A few threads have overlapped into discussions of pedifile priests, and I had mentioned this is a few of them, in which a few responded wanting proof of the claims I wrote concerning abuse done by others, and not the priests in question. Read it all, what I quoted is documented in this and was not something I just made up. I highlighted the parts in question.


FindArticles / Business / Risk Management / Jan, 2003
The problem of false claims of clergy sexual abuse
by David R. Price, James J. McDonald, Jr.
.123Next ...More Articles of Interest
America's most wanted j-o-b-s - 10 hottest employment opportunities
The dropout dilemma: One in four college freshmen drop out. What is going on here? What does it take to stay in?
7 tips for effective listening: productive listening does not occur naturally. It requires hard work and practice - Back To Basics - effective listening is a crucial skill for internal auditors
Culture, leadership, and power: the keys to organizational change - includes bibliography
S.C. operators stand ready to toast new free-pour law
.The Catholic Church has experienced an epidemic of sexual misconduct allegations and lawsuits in the United States. In some cases, evidence that the church knew of sexual misconduct and had effectively concealed them has created a dire social and legal predicament. Although U.S. Catholic bishops have adopted a zero-tolerance policy for its priests and ministers, the church still faces a long and costly road of litigation that any organization in which adults supervise children--especially religious institutions--would do well to learn from.

Such incidents of abuse claims may result not only in criminal charges, but in costly civil actions as well. As Jason Berry reports in his book, Lead Us Not Into Temptation: Catholic Priests and the Sexual Abuse of Children, the Catholic Church alone has paid out over $400 million in clergy sexual abuse settlements and this total is expected to reach at least $1 billion before the spate of claims tapers off.

Cases of sexual abuse against children are both tragic and inexcusable. But as with any situation in which there are numerous claims of sexual abuse against a single defendant, some of those claims will be false. With grave sensitivity, it is the risk manager's duty to evaluate claims in light of this fact.

The Problem of False Claims

In 1993, the late Cardinal Joseph Bernardin, then archbishop of Chicago, was named as a defendant in a lawsuit filed in federal court in Cincinnati by a former seminarian who alleged he was the victim of sexual abuse by Bernardin and another priest when Bernardin was archbishop of Cincinnati. The plaintiff, who at the time of the suit was dying of AIDS, had apparently recovered a "memory" of the abuse while undergoing hypnosis performed by an unlicensed hypnotist. The lawsuit against Bernardin was widely publicized, but three months later, the plaintiff dropped the lawsuit and recanted his allegations against Bernardin.

In 2002, an accusation of abuse against Cardinal Roger Mahony of Los Angeles generated a huge media stir, if not an actual lawsuit. A woman alleged that Mahony sexually abused her in 1970 when she was a student at a Catholic high school in Fresno, California. She claimed she was knocked unconscious during a fight with other students and when she awoke her underwear was missing and Mahony was standing nearby. The Los Angeles Times reported that this woman said she was motivated to press forward with her charges thirty-two years later because the state was cutting her disability payments and she needed "a cash settlement from the Church." The woman admitted to having been diagnosed with schizophrenia, and she told the Los Angeles Times nearly everyone she had encountered in her life, including her parents, other family members, classmates and coworkers, had molested, abused or emotionally mistreated her. The Fresno Bee reported that the woman admitted she did not know if she was molested or even touched by Mahony. "All I said was that when I opened my eyes, some of my clothes were gone and he was the only one around. I was unconscious. I don't know if he molested me, but he could have," the woman told the paper. Mahony yeas later cleared.

Why False Claims Are Made

The reasons behind a false claim are varied. Some claims may be intentionally fabricated to obtain a monetary award or to gain revenge, but this is uncommon. More likely, a false claim could be the result of a psychological illness. For example, the false accuser could suffer from an erotomanic delusion in which the individual believes that he or she is in love with another (such as the alleged abuser). Or, a false claim could stem from a persecutory delusion in which a person feels conspired against, harassed or abused.

Personality disorders are one source of psychological illness that may cause a person to make a false accusation. Exhibited by late adolescence or early adulthood these disorders influence the way individuals perceive, interact and respond to their environment. Borderline personality disorder, for example, is characterized by pervasive patterns of instability with interpersonal relationships, self-image and mood. These individuals often have dramatic shifts in their view of others, can exhibit borderline rage, and engage in punitive and vindictive acts in retaliation against an authority figure's perceived rejection of them. Histrionic personality disorder, on the other hand, is characterized by excessive emotionality and attention-seeking, which can result in a wish to assume the role of a victim.

Autistic fantasy, a psychological defense mechanism, compels an individual to deal with emotional conflict or stress by excessive daydreaming as a substitute for human relationships. Such individuals may daydream about a sexual relationship or inappropriate sexual behavior and convince themselves that it has occurred.

Projective identification, another defense mechanism, may induce an individual to falsely attribute to others his or her own unacceptable feelings, impulses or thoughts.

Misdirected Accusations

Some of those who lodge false claims of abuse against authority figures such as priests, ministers, teachers or coaches have in fact been abused--sometimes on several occasions by different perpetrators--but not by the individual targeted in the claim. What accounts for the misdirected accusation?

One culprit could be displacement, a psychological defense mechanism in which an individual deals with an emotional conflict or internal or external stressors by transferring a feeling about one object onto another (usually less threatening) object. Just as an employee abused by her spouse might, via displacement, accuse a supervisor of abusing her because she cannot come to terms emotionally with the reality of spousal abuse, so too might a person abused by a parent displace his feelings of anger onto a priest, teacher or other authority figure who was present during that time when he suffered abuse.

In the book, Sexual Abuse in Christian Homes and Churches, Carolyn Haggen reports that the best predictor of sexual abuse of a child by his or her parent is alcoholism, followed by a conservative religious belief. This may set the stage for an individual who was in regular contact with someone in the clergy and who has been abused within the family context, but accuses a member of the clergy of the abuse via displacement.

Factitious Disorder

The concept of factitious sexual harassment might also have some pertinence to false claims of clergy sexual abuse. A factitious disorder is characterized by physical or psychological symptoms that are intentionally produced in order to assume the sick role. The late Sara Feldman-Schorrig, M.D., who coined this term, observed that some who file sexual harassment claims do so as a result of a need to portray themselves as victims.

Schorrig cites several reasons why someone would feel the need to assume victim status, including the need to process feelings of distress resulting from abuse from other sources, the eliciting of emotional support and the opportunity to release anger against an identifiable target. The individual may also gratify preexisting needs for revenge. Or the victim role can be a means of converting socially unacceptable disabilities into socially acceptable conditions as a way to elicit sympathy and concern from family, to obtain status or to obtain financial reward.

Schorrig concludes that the possible existence of a factitious disorder on the part of a claimant alleging sexual abuse "at the very least" has a bearing on the "credibility or lack thereof" of the claimant.
Recovered Memories

Other claimants of abuse may be troubled personalities who are especially vulnerable to suggestion by therapists, attorneys or laypersons.

Some claims of clergy sexual abuse are brought years after the alleged abuse occurred. Such claims often rely on "recovered memories," a controversial psychological technique that purports to uncover patients' repressed memories of abuse and other emotional traumas. Plaintiffs may allege that memories of abuse were recently recovered so that they can surmount the statute of limitations problem that otherwise would result from bringing a claim many years after the alleged event. Many states provide that the limitations period for the filing of claims for childhood sexual abuse is tolled during the period in which the plaintiff has no memory of such abuse. This is also known as the "delayed discovery rule."
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Postby bionic » Fri Feb 10, 2012 12:29 pm

I feel, it's a complicated issue..with plenty of perverts and nut jobs to go around..and not just for the church, but any organization in which adults are left alone with kids, especially..when men are left alone with kids(sorry but it's true)..which is a-lot

I often wonder when the Boy Scouts is going to have it's HUGE scandal..
I say this because I have a friend who'se dad was BIG in the boy Scouts..so important when he died he had a Boy Scout funeral.
I alos know this man was a perve of the worst order. So I can guess the mischeif he got into. The lives he ruined..on the downlow, of course. He was also, on the surface, the nicest, most jovial fatherly seeming kind of guy. people adored him. Ugh.
because of him, my son never bwas or will be a Boy Scout (which is sad because I was a Gril Scout and loved it and had wanted to ge tmy kid into scouting, as a child..the young me had planned that..until I met and learned about my friend's dad)

it's part of life..a dark part of life..but it is as such
Willie Wonka quotes..
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Postby greeney2 » Fri Feb 10, 2012 1:23 pm

The bottomline is the truth is, insurance companies say they pay out as many claims for clergy claims that are not Catholic, as well as teacher abuse claims and scout abuse claims. Those in positions of authority like the single male teacher in a young classroom.

The truth is that these are a very small number compared to other priests, other teachers, other scout leaders, etc. etc.

When John was in scouts to me honest, there was always a big shortage of Dad's in cub scouts. Our pack leader was a man I worked with, but for the most part, we had mostly Mothers who were den leaders over the years he was in it. I never ever saw anything of a sexual nature in any priest, never herd of anything happening. The only teacher I had in the 7th grade was fired for not taking any guff from kids, and boy or girl, he would grab and pull your hair, and in one case took a boy in a hammerlock and slamme him against the wall, but that was in 1959. We had PE teachers that would give boys a haircut if it was too long, and that was way before the hippy days.
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Postby event_horizon » Fri Feb 10, 2012 4:31 pm

So what point are you trying to make here, greeny? That all of these claims against priests are made by mentally ill people? I'm sure you'd love to believe that.

All it takes is one real claim to be made for the false ones to follow suit. That's how these things usually get started. Granted, there are probably isolated cases where the first claim is false, based on chance.

Out of all the priests that are charged in these things, what percentage of them do you think are completely innocent? I'd say that at least 90% of them are guilty of at least one molestation. But usually when these sick individuals are caught, it's never just once.

And don't forget about all the ones that are too afraid to come forward out of embarrassment or humiliation (which is also psychological) -- conveniently, you don't bother mentioning anything about those people. So basically, you could say that for every mentally ill person making a false claim, there's someone else not making their real claim. It makes you wonder how many priests are still getting away with it because their victims are afraid to come forward.
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Postby event_horizon » Fri Feb 10, 2012 4:44 pm

greeney2 wrote:The bottomline is the truth is, insurance companies say they pay out as many claims for clergy claims that are not Catholic, as well as teacher abuse claims and scout abuse claims. Those in positions of authority like the single male teacher in a young classroom.


But the thing that's more outrageous about the priests doing it is that they are supposed to be preaching on behalf of a "higher authority". That's what makes people more disgusted with them than the others. So...it's not just atheists or liberals that are more upset with them (because of what they represent), but your own brethren are just as increasingly upset with them as us, because they are supposed to be the representatives of your beliefs. They are doing the very evil/abominable things they're supposed to be preaching against.

Hopefully that makes you understand why there's more hostility towards pedophile priests than the other pedophiles in other positions of authority.

greeney2 wrote:I never ever saw anything of a sexual nature in any priest, never herd of anything happening.


<<<newsflash>>>.....just because it doesn't happen in your tiny bubble of existence, doesn't mean it isn't happening elsewhere.
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Postby greeney2 » Fri Feb 10, 2012 7:15 pm

Either you do not read, or just love stiring up sh*t just to be a jerk. I never implied it does not happen or that some priests are guilty of it, I even said some are legitimatly guilty. I specifically said that when one real pedifile priest is found out, the attorney groups have a line of people on the bandwaggon, and many of them are phoney, absolutely. The very ideas of the Pedifilia has juries so outraged to begin with, and add to that anti-catholic sentiments of the world, and it spells one big giant word. SETTLEMENT is all they care about. These attorneys, and many of the clients know, the awards can be so outrageous and overblown, they know SETTLEMENTS are going to be big, and the insurance companies are paying them, afraid of the cost of fighting them and the awards. When they make settlements you never find out if they were legitimate cases and that is what they bank on.

Did I say they were all innocent, absolutly not, but the one that is guilty opens the floodgates for 550 people to show up out of the woodwork, just like any number of deep pockets lawsuits. If you want to believe all priests are pedifiles, be my guest, but do not put words in my mouth that are not true. If you want to believe that SETTLEMENTS are not what they are looking for, and why the phoney claims are filed, you are fooling yourself, just like fender bender accidents and going off to the whiplash and pain claims, that are impossible to disproove. Just like those, its impossible to disproove pedifilia, so they make SETTLEMENTS.

You practically called me a liar for the statement I made about abuse by others, so this was for you, to show you there are people who are scamming, people who are abuse victims of others, or mistaken having mental problems. Yes, there are some that were really abused, and it really happened. I also did not make up the statistics, quoted by the insurance companies, that Catholic claims are no higher than claims of other religions, which goes along with the anti-catholic/anti-Pope opinions, in which juries have made huge awards against. In some cases rightfully, but not rightfully in other cases. Many of these settlements were made purly from association of time periods these guilty priests were are their parish.

Why do I think you could care less about the true guilt or innocence?
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Postby frrostedman » Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:28 am

We are all fallen creatures. Priests of any denomination are not excluded from this fact.

Can anyone think of another scenario where a grown man is surrounded by young boys and in a position of complete power and control over them?

If we can bring these scenarios to light, and draw a comparison, I'm pretty sure what we'll find is that Priests are much like everyone else.

Adult boy scout leaders comes to mind - although they still aren't in a position of such power and control as a priest is.

I'm saying it's not Catholicism that's the problem. It's the scenario where young boys are subjected to the power and leadership of any man, who can do whatever he wants unwatched and unchecked. I think we could put any type of man in the position of the priest and you will find that the same ratio of "other" people will do the same thing these priests are doing.

However........ because of the very nature of the priest's position, he is supposed to be the LAST person on Earth to partake in such activities. But "supposed to be" and reality are two different things most of the time. I do not believe that men groom themselves to be priests in a planned effort to take advantage of young boys. What I do believe is many of these priests didn't even know they had an attraction to young boys until they found themselves in a position to take advantage of it. Any priest worth his salt, at the very moment of discovering this weakness, should voluntarily have himself defrocked.
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Postby greeney2 » Sat Feb 11, 2012 1:13 am

99% of the total numbers of priests are exactly what you say Tom. I agree with EH that it is particually repulsive that who is supose to be a man of God could possibly do something like this. Do not think that this is limited to Priests alone, becasue the insurance companies paying these liability claims state that Catholic priest claim are equal to other claims for other clergy. Its the priests and Catholics that dominate the media. We think of anyone ordained as beyond reproach, and as a Catholic we raised that the tought of harming a Priest in any way would be an unthinkable act. To betry such a spirtual link regarding you pastor or priest, as a Holy link with God, is just beyond discription. You do not have that element with a scout leader, or teacher, but you do have the assumption or complete and total trust morally. They are the ones who raise the bar of our development, thinking in higher levels, and teaching moral fiber at the same time, ethics, standards, fairness, etc.
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Postby event_horizon » Sat Feb 11, 2012 1:57 pm

greeney2 wrote:Either you do not read, or just love stiring up sh*t just to be a jerk. I never implied it does not happen or that some priests are guilty of it, I even said some are legitimatly guilty. I specifically said that when one real pedifile priest is found out, the attorney groups have a line of people on the bandwaggon, and many of them are phoney, absolutely. The very ideas of the Pedifilia has juries so outraged to begin with, and add to that anti-catholic sentiments of the world, and it spells one big giant word. SETTLEMENT is all they care about. These attorneys, and many of the clients know, the awards can be so outrageous and overblown, they know SETTLEMENTS are going to be big, and the insurance companies are paying them, afraid of the cost of fighting them and the awards. When they make settlements you never find out if they were legitimate cases and that is what they bank on.

Did I say they were all innocent, absolutly not, but the one that is guilty opens the floodgates for 550 people to show up out of the woodwork, just like any number of deep pockets lawsuits. If you want to believe all priests are pedifiles, be my guest, but do not put words in my mouth that are not true. If you want to believe that SETTLEMENTS are not what they are looking for, and why the phoney claims are filed, you are fooling yourself, just like fender bender accidents and going off to the whiplash and pain claims, that are impossible to disproove. Just like those, its impossible to disproove pedifilia, so they make SETTLEMENTS.

You practically called me a liar for the statement I made about abuse by others, so this was for you, to show you there are people who are scamming, people who are abuse victims of others, or mistaken having mental problems. Yes, there are some that were really abused, and it really happened. I also did not make up the statistics, quoted by the insurance companies, that Catholic claims are no higher than claims of other religions, which goes along with the anti-catholic/anti-Pope opinions, in which juries have made huge awards against. In some cases rightfully, but not rightfully in other cases. Many of these settlements were made purly from association of time periods these guilty priests were are their parish.

Why do I think you could care less about the true guilt or innocence?


"WAAAAAA WAAAAAAAAA WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA"

These false claim settlements are completely irrelevant to the point. The point is at least 90% of them are guilty of pedophilia, plain and simple. I don't give a rat's ass if other people follow up on true claims to get a piece of the pie. So what. Those people have their own issues. You seem to be missing the big picture, as always.

All priests that are guilty of just ONE TRUE CLAIM should be hung by the balls from a tree until their sack snaps.

greeney2 wrote:Did I say they were all innocent, absolutly not, but the one that is guilty opens the floodgates for 550 people to show up out of the woodwork, just like any number of deep pockets lawsuits.


Hah hah hah!!! So out of all those people, now you think only one of them is telling the truth? :lol:

Why are you so concerned about the people that are making false claims? You appear to be a lot more upset with them than your sick pedophile priests. Where's your outrage about their evil deeds?

greeney2 wrote:If you want to believe all priests are pedifiles, be my guest


I never said that. I said out of all those charged, at least 90% are guilty.

greeney2 wrote:but do not put words in my mouth that are not true.


What? Like you? You do that sh*t ALL THE TIME, like just now, hypocrite. You need to get "HYPOCRITE" tattooed on your forehead....backwards, like on the front of an ambulance, and put sirens on top of your head.

greeney2 wrote:You practically called me a liar for the statement I made about abuse by others,


You need to quote where you think I did that because I have no idea WTF you're talking about.

greeney2 wrote:so this was for you, to show you there are people who are scamming, people who are abuse victims of others, or mistaken having mental problems. Yes, there are some that were really abused, and it really happened.


Just for me? I'm flattered.

Why make another thread? It was completely unnecessary. Why not just post this in the thread where this was brought up?

greeney2 wrote:Why do I think you could care less about the true guilt or innocence?


I don't know why you think anything.
I don't believe what I believe because it's what I desire to believe. I believe what I believe because it's what logic and reason cause me to believe. All I want is to live with the truth -- nothing more, nothing less.
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Postby zoltan2 » Sun Feb 12, 2012 6:52 am

greeney2 wrote:A few threads have overlapped into discussions of pedifile priests, and I had mentioned this is a few of them, in which a few responded wanting proof of the claims I wrote concerning abuse done by others, and not the priests in question. Read it all, what I quoted is documented in this and was not something I just made up. I highlighted the parts in question.


FindArticles / Business / Risk Management / Jan, 2003
The problem of false claims of clergy sexual abuse
by David R. Price, James J. McDonald, Jr.
.123Next ...More Articles of Interest
America's most wanted j-o-b-s - 10 hottest employment opportunities
The dropout dilemma: One in four college freshmen drop out. What is going on here? What does it take to stay in?
7 tips for effective listening: productive listening does not occur naturally. It requires hard work and practice - Back To Basics - effective listening is a crucial skill for internal auditors
Culture, leadership, and power: the keys to organizational change - includes bibliography
S.C. operators stand ready to toast new free-pour law
.The Catholic Church has experienced an epidemic of sexual misconduct allegations and lawsuits in the United States. In some cases, evidence that the church knew of sexual misconduct and had effectively concealed them has created a dire social and legal predicament. Although U.S. Catholic bishops have adopted a zero-tolerance policy for its priests and ministers, the church still faces a long and costly road of litigation that any organization in which adults supervise children--especially religious institutions--would do well to learn from.

Such incidents of abuse claims may result not only in criminal charges, but in costly civil actions as well. As Jason Berry reports in his book, Lead Us Not Into Temptation: Catholic Priests and the Sexual Abuse of Children, the Catholic Church alone has paid out over $400 million in clergy sexual abuse settlements and this total is expected to reach at least $1 billion before the spate of claims tapers off.

Cases of sexual abuse against children are both tragic and inexcusable. But as with any situation in which there are numerous claims of sexual abuse against a single defendant, some of those claims will be false. With grave sensitivity, it is the risk manager's duty to evaluate claims in light of this fact.

The Problem of False Claims

In 1993, the late Cardinal Joseph Bernardin, then archbishop of Chicago, was named as a defendant in a lawsuit filed in federal court in Cincinnati by a former seminarian who alleged he was the victim of sexual abuse by Bernardin and another priest when Bernardin was archbishop of Cincinnati. The plaintiff, who at the time of the suit was dying of AIDS, had apparently recovered a "memory" of the abuse while undergoing hypnosis performed by an unlicensed hypnotist. The lawsuit against Bernardin was widely publicized, but three months later, the plaintiff dropped the lawsuit and recanted his allegations against Bernardin.

In 2002, an accusation of abuse against Cardinal Roger Mahony of Los Angeles generated a huge media stir, if not an actual lawsuit. A woman alleged that Mahony sexually abused her in 1970 when she was a student at a Catholic high school in Fresno, California. She claimed she was knocked unconscious during a fight with other students and when she awoke her underwear was missing and Mahony was standing nearby. The Los Angeles Times reported that this woman said she was motivated to press forward with her charges thirty-two years later because the state was cutting her disability payments and she needed "a cash settlement from the Church." The woman admitted to having been diagnosed with schizophrenia, and she told the Los Angeles Times nearly everyone she had encountered in her life, including her parents, other family members, classmates and coworkers, had molested, abused or emotionally mistreated her. The Fresno Bee reported that the woman admitted she did not know if she was molested or even touched by Mahony. "All I said was that when I opened my eyes, some of my clothes were gone and he was the only one around. I was unconscious. I don't know if he molested me, but he could have," the woman told the paper. Mahony yeas later cleared.

Why False Claims Are Made

The reasons behind a false claim are varied. Some claims may be intentionally fabricated to obtain a monetary award or to gain revenge, but this is uncommon. More likely, a false claim could be the result of a psychological illness. For example, the false accuser could suffer from an erotomanic delusion in which the individual believes that he or she is in love with another (such as the alleged abuser). Or, a false claim could stem from a persecutory delusion in which a person feels conspired against, harassed or abused.

Personality disorders are one source of psychological illness that may cause a person to make a false accusation. Exhibited by late adolescence or early adulthood these disorders influence the way individuals perceive, interact and respond to their environment. Borderline personality disorder, for example, is characterized by pervasive patterns of instability with interpersonal relationships, self-image and mood. These individuals often have dramatic shifts in their view of others, can exhibit borderline rage, and engage in punitive and vindictive acts in retaliation against an authority figure's perceived rejection of them. Histrionic personality disorder, on the other hand, is characterized by excessive emotionality and attention-seeking, which can result in a wish to assume the role of a victim.

Autistic fantasy, a psychological defense mechanism, compels an individual to deal with emotional conflict or stress by excessive daydreaming as a substitute for human relationships. Such individuals may daydream about a sexual relationship or inappropriate sexual behavior and convince themselves that it has occurred.

Projective identification, another defense mechanism, may induce an individual to falsely attribute to others his or her own unacceptable feelings, impulses or thoughts.

Misdirected Accusations

Some of those who lodge false claims of abuse against authority figures such as priests, ministers, teachers or coaches have in fact been abused--sometimes on several occasions by different perpetrators--but not by the individual targeted in the claim. What accounts for the misdirected accusation?

One culprit could be displacement, a psychological defense mechanism in which an individual deals with an emotional conflict or internal or external stressors by transferring a feeling about one object onto another (usually less threatening) object. Just as an employee abused by her spouse might, via displacement, accuse a supervisor of abusing her because she cannot come to terms emotionally with the reality of spousal abuse, so too might a person abused by a parent displace his feelings of anger onto a priest, teacher or other authority figure who was present during that time when he suffered abuse.

In the book, Sexual Abuse in Christian Homes and Churches, Carolyn Haggen reports that the best predictor of sexual abuse of a child by his or her parent is alcoholism, followed by a conservative religious belief. This may set the stage for an individual who was in regular contact with someone in the clergy and who has been abused within the family context, but accuses a member of the clergy of the abuse via displacement.

Factitious Disorder

The concept of factitious sexual harassment might also have some pertinence to false claims of clergy sexual abuse. A factitious disorder is characterized by physical or psychological symptoms that are intentionally produced in order to assume the sick role. The late Sara Feldman-Schorrig, M.D., who coined this term, observed that some who file sexual harassment claims do so as a result of a need to portray themselves as victims.

Schorrig cites several reasons why someone would feel the need to assume victim status, including the need to process feelings of distress resulting from abuse from other sources, the eliciting of emotional support and the opportunity to release anger against an identifiable target. The individual may also gratify preexisting needs for revenge. Or the victim role can be a means of converting socially unacceptable disabilities into socially acceptable conditions as a way to elicit sympathy and concern from family, to obtain status or to obtain financial reward.

Schorrig concludes that the possible existence of a factitious disorder on the part of a claimant alleging sexual abuse "at the very least" has a bearing on the "credibility or lack thereof" of the claimant.
Recovered Memories

Other claimants of abuse may be troubled personalities who are especially vulnerable to suggestion by therapists, attorneys or laypersons.

Some claims of clergy sexual abuse are brought years after the alleged abuse occurred. Such claims often rely on "recovered memories," a controversial psychological technique that purports to uncover patients' repressed memories of abuse and other emotional traumas. Plaintiffs may allege that memories of abuse were recently recovered so that they can surmount the statute of limitations problem that otherwise would result from bringing a claim many years after the alleged event. Many states provide that the limitations period for the filing of claims for childhood sexual abuse is tolled during the period in which the plaintiff has no memory of such abuse. This is also known as the "delayed discovery rule."


I thought you did not do any copy and past. :naughty: :naughty: :naughty: :naughty: :naughty:
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