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New Chess Opening (Humphreys)

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Postby frrostedman » Mon Jun 04, 2012 8:04 pm

One idea I have is to skip the c4 move. I just naturally move c4 before developing my queen's knight. But that would save me a tempo.
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Postby frrostedman » Mon Jun 04, 2012 8:04 pm

I wasn't really wanting to go there but, maybe it IS best that we just play out a few games. You will obviously beat me but we could discuss as we go.
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Postby humphreys » Tue Jun 05, 2012 2:00 am

frrostedman wrote:I wasn't really wanting to go there but, maybe it IS best that we just play out a few games. You will obviously beat me but we could discuss as we go.


The problem is, to do this properly I'd have to go and review a good dozen or so of your games where you've used the opening, and see the different variations you're using against the various responses and strategies the opponents can use.

It's too big of a job.

I know you don't like them, but have you considered using a computer program for analysis? Something like Rybka could be helpful for immediately finding the flaws and weaknesses in an opening, which can really help with refining it. Sorry I haven't been of more help.

I would like to play out a couple of games with you, and it will definitely help me get a feel for the opening, but I'm well out of practice so I'll make no promises about great play on my side. I'll have the aim of not trying to refute the opening outright, but just by playing very standard textbook chess, developing quickly, castling, and playing positionally, because I think that's where the opening will struggle the most to make an impact.

Set the games up when you're ready and we'll give it a go.
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Postby frrostedman » Tue Jun 05, 2012 5:23 pm

I'll set them up but again, this Frosty opening's biggest advantage is the element of surprise. With you being a superior player, plus being familiar with what I'm trying to do, you will certainly crush me.

But that's ok, I'm trying to figure out what black moves to watch out for and what alternate plans I can make when those moves happen.

See you there and thanks for all the time you spent humoring me.
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Postby humphreys » Wed Jun 06, 2012 2:06 am

Highly doubt I will crush you!

Even at my best usually it was only a single mistake on your part that separated us.

Has anyone played e5 then f6 as black to block the diagonal?
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Postby frrostedman » Wed Jun 06, 2012 6:03 pm

Yes, people have played e5/f6 but not often. f6 is not a favorable move most of the time. anyway, most of the pressure is along the e6 diagonal (white diagonal) so most of the time if people are going to bother clogging a diagonal with prawns, it's that one.
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Postby Cole_Trickle » Thu Jun 07, 2012 3:07 am

Recently had a go at a Program, gave up the match after it denied an en passant. Wonder who wrote the program? LOL
Chess openings are ancient, any of the obvious can be exploited by any good player with decent end game knowledge. I used to play at a respectable level, not so much any more, but a bit of polish will quickly remove any rust.

Developing pieces isn't as effective as protecting pieces. Some people play for years and never accept this as a basic fundamental tactics, they just go on and continue to get pounded into sand.

Certain openings lead to certain end games, mastering those end games will vastly improve your level of play which in the end makes many openings obsolete.

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Postby humphreys » Thu Jun 07, 2012 3:35 am

Obviously you develop and protect your pieces. You can't protect a piece that isn't developed anyway, so it's clear development is primary.

Most openings develop pieces and protect them.

No great point having a protected piece that cannot move and has no part in your plan.
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Postby frrostedman » Thu Jun 07, 2012 6:05 pm

Cole is right about one thing. Thorough study in end game strategy is key to becoming a great player, and it really helps you in the middle game as you can strive for a certain position that otherwise wouldn't have been obvious.

I am severely lacking in end game study. Of course, I never had a goal in mind to do anything with chess but play socially. Sort of like golf.
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Postby humphreys » Fri Jun 08, 2012 1:15 am

Absolutely, studying the end games will help you become great, but first, to become really good, and it's kinda connected to end games too, but it's to always play with a plan. You should always be trying to achieve something specific, rather than just trying to make nice moves.

A protected knight on an outpost is good, but a protected knight on an outpost that was worked there because it facilitates your specific attack on the kingside is so much better. All the pieces need to work together for the same goal.

Obviously there are tons of exceptions to every rule, but as a general principle I think that's a good thing to strive for.

My endgame skill is greatly lacking too. I find endgames the most boring part of chess, that's why I'm bad at them.
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