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Another Step Closer To A One World Religion:

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Postby Guest » Thu Jun 30, 2011 1:53 am

Greeney2

I beg to differ.

A religious war is a war caused by, or justified by, religious differences. It can involve one state with an established religion against another state with a different religion or a different sect within the same religion, or a religiously motivated group attempting to spread its faith by violence, or to suppress another group because of its religious beliefs or practices. The Muslim conquests, the French Wars of Religion, the Crusades, and the Reconquista are frequently cited historical examples, especially in History Books.


The Crusades were a series of military campaigns—usually sanctioned by the Papacy—that took place during the 11th through 13th centuries in response to the Muslim Conquests. Originally, the goal was to recapture Jerusalem and the Holy Land from the Muslims, and support the besieged Christian Byzantine Empire against the Muslim Seljuq expansion into Asia Minor and Europe proper. Later, Crusades were launched against other targets, either for religious reasons, such as the Albigensian Crusade, the Northern Crusades, or because of political conflict, such as the Aragonese Crusade. In 1095, at the Council of Clermont, Pope Urban II raised the level of war from bellum iustum ("just war"), to bellum sacrum (holy war).

French Wars of Religion


In 16th Century France there was a succession of wars between Roman Catholics and Protestants (Hugenots primarily). These series of wars were known as the Wars of Religion.


Thirty Years War and European wars of religion

In the first half of the 17th century, the German states, Scandinavia (Sweden, primarily) and Poland were beset by religious warfare. Roman Catholicism and Protestantism figured in the opposing sides of this conflict, though Catholic France did take the side of the Protestants but purely for political reasons.

Taiping Rebellion

Inspired by a formerly illegal Protestant missionary tract in China, the core of the Taiping faith focused on the belief that Shangdi, the high God of classical China, had chosen the Taiping leader, Hong Xiuquan, to establish his Heavenly Kingdom on Earth.

The Taiping rebels, professing this new creed, were able to mount their rebellion and recruit multitudes of followers in their sweep through the empire. The Taiping rebels denounced the divine pretensions of the imperial title and the sacred character of the imperial office as blasphemous usurpation of Shangdi’s title and position. In place of the imperial institution, the rebels called for a restoration of the classical system of kingship. Previous rebellions had declared their contemporary dynasties corrupt and therefore in need of revival; the Taiping, by contrast, branded the entire imperial order blasphemous and in need of replacement.

The Bible, in particular a Chinese translation of the Old Testament, profoundly influenced Hong and his followers, leading them to understand the first three of the Ten Commandments as an indictment of the imperial order. The rebels thus sought to destroy imperial culture, along with its institutions and Confucian underpinnings, all of which they regarded as blasphemous. Strongly iconoclastic, the Taiping followers smashed religious statues and imperially approved icons throughout the lands they conquered.

The Guinness Book of World Records calls this the "bloodiest civil war" with some 20 million estimated dead.
Islam
Jihad, Divisions of the world in Islam, Islamic military jurisprudence, Islam and violence, and Islamic terrorism

Jihad means "to strive or struggle" in the way of God, and is sometimes referred to as the sixth pillar of Islam, although it has no official status. In the West, jihad is often understood as Holy War. Jihads are usually called to convert other non-Muslim states. This happened many times throughout history, such as Muhammad's war against the pagan Arabs and the wars to spread Islam undertaken by the Caliphates and the Ottoman Empire.

Judaism
Milkhemet Mitzvah

In the Jewish religion, the expression Milkhemet Mitzvah (Hebrew: מלחמת מצווה, "commandment war") refers to a war that is both obligatory for all Jews (men and women) and limited to territory within the borders of the land of Israel. The geographical limits of Israel, and therefore of this religious war, are detailed in the Tanakh, the Hebrew Bible, especially Numbers 34:1-15 and Ezekiel 47:13-20.

In short, 809 million people have died in religious wars. That’s nearly a billion people.

Oftentimes, a retort is that secular ideals and Godless Communism have killed many more. It is true that Stalin, among others, slaughtered his own people by the millions during the industrialization of Soviet Russia. By comparison, 209 million have died in the name of Communism. Some 62 million died during World War II, civilian and military, on all sides. Conclusively, more people have died in the name of religion than in the name of Communism or Hitler, or the two combined times two.
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Postby Guest » Thu Jun 30, 2011 2:07 am

Greeney 2 wrote:
Of all the major wars and conflicts in history to before Christ, the causes of only a very few were religious in nature or casued by religions. Statistics were given that even estimated even the Crusades. and they pailed in comparison to WW2 and WW1. Neither were religious wars, and in no case in history was the United States ever in any religious wars.

Tichan:

I was not making a comparison between religious wars and all other wars.
My point is that to many people have died in the name of religion.

And what you are seeing right now in the middle east is also a religious war involving Islam the Jewish faith and Christianity headed by the popes.
Do not forget that the Catholic Vatican Sea as always been behind the side wings pulling the stings to their advantage.
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Postby bionic » Thu Jun 30, 2011 2:29 am

qmark wrote:Do we need a religion? No.

Do we need Jesus Christ? Absolutely.

If I was in a church that started to read the Koran, I would get up and walk out or I would just tune out that particular service and never go back.



Jesus is in the Qu'ran , you know
He is seen as a sort of Saint
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam
Last edited by bionic on Thu Jun 30, 2011 8:32 am, edited 1 time in total.
Willie Wonka quotes..
What is this Wonka, some kind of funhouse?
Why? Are you having fun?
A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men.
We are the music makers, we are the dreamers of dreams
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Postby bionic » Thu Jun 30, 2011 2:33 am

about wars and religion.
I have observed that most of the wars throughout history, even those that wear a religous garment, were/are really about gathering or defending resources and domination, conquering or fighting that off from another culture, in order to gather or protect more resources.
Willie Wonka quotes..
What is this Wonka, some kind of funhouse?
Why? Are you having fun?
A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men.
We are the music makers, we are the dreamers of dreams
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Postby Guest » Thu Jun 30, 2011 3:42 am

bionic wrote:
qmark wrote:Do we need a religion? No.

Do we need Jesus Christ? Absolutely.

If I was in a church that started to read the Koran, I would get up and walk out or I would just tune out that particular service and never go back.



Jeusu is in the Qu'ran , you know
He is seen as a sort of Saint
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam


He is seen as a prophet

The Qur'an repeatedly reminds that Jesus was a human prophet sent by God, not part of God Himself.
The Quran rejects the concept of Trinity God the Father, God the son, God the Holy Spirit - as strongly as it rejects the concept of Jesus as the son of God. This is because GOD IS ONE. Three cannot be one.
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Postby bionic » Thu Jun 30, 2011 8:33 am

an infinity of ones can be one if "the kingdom is within you"
:dance:
Willie Wonka quotes..
What is this Wonka, some kind of funhouse?
Why? Are you having fun?
A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men.
We are the music makers, we are the dreamers of dreams
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Posts: 9889
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Postby greeney2 » Thu Jun 30, 2011 10:04 am

Tichan of the 4 major war you quoted, the high end estimates of them was 55 million dead from all 4, WW2 alone was 72 million and not a religous war. Do the math from these charts, this in no way shows 800 million dead from religious wars.
You seem to have a problem with statistics, and making the correct conclusions from them.
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Postby Guest » Thu Jun 30, 2011 11:21 am

greeney2 wrote:Tichan of the 4 major war you quoted, the high end estimates of them was 55 million dead from all 4, WW2 alone was 72 million and not a religous war. Do the math from these charts, this in no way shows 800 million dead from religious wars.
You seem to have a problem with statistics, and making the correct conclusions from them.





Greeney 2

I am talking about people dead because of religious wars since time recorded and this before Christ.
Again my point its not about religion versus non religion wars. Its about millions of people have died since recorded time because of religions.
Exact numbers would be impossible to know, but it must be in the
millions. The simple fact that major religions failed to order their
followers NOT to go to war, but actually promoted their involvement,
makes them directly responsible.

8 atrocities committed in the name of religion


http://listverse.com/2008/04/02/8-atroc ... -religion/
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Postby qmark » Thu Jun 30, 2011 1:54 pm

tichan wrote:
qmark wrote:Do we need a religion? No.

Do we need Jesus Christ? Absolutely.

If I was in a church that started to read the Koran, I would get up and walk out or I would just tune out that particular service and never go back.


Why


Are you asking why do we need Jesus? See below.
Because of who He is and what He has accomplished. He is the way, the truth, and the life. No one goes to the Father except through Him. He is the door, anyone who enters through Him will be saved. Those are Jesus’ words.

Are you asking why I would walk out? See above.
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Postby greeney2 » Thu Jun 30, 2011 2:15 pm

The statistics proove you under a misconception either way you are trying to discribe what you mean. Like I said I'm not going to go over this again and agian for you, and your accessment of facts and figures, persentages and what they mean, is painfully lacking. :wall: AGAIN!
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