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Afghanistan: So it really was all for nothing.
September 28, 2015
7:15 pm
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Nigfis
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This is what it looks like, six months after declaring victory and going home....

http://www.theguardian.com/wor.....ity-kunduz

 

Taliban capture key Afghan provincial capital Kunduz

Militants capture government and UN buildings and city jail in one of the biggest military victories for movement since 2001

 Alleged Taliban militants patrol on an Afghan police vehicle after they reportedly took control of most of Kunduz city, Afghanistan Photograph: EPAImage Enlarger

The Taliban have captured Kunduz in northern Afghanistan, taking government buildings and the city’s central prison in one of the biggest military victories for the movement since 2001. It is the most serious invasion of a provincial capital in 14 years.

The Taliban entered the city during an early morning assault on Monday, storming the regional hospital and clashing with security forces at the nearby university.

A statement from the Afghan government confirmed the city had fallen to the militants. It is the first time the insurgents have seized a major urban area since the US-led invasion in 2001.

By the afternoon, militants had reportedly captured the intelligence service headquarters, set fire to UN buildings and released hundreds of prisoners from the city’s jail, according to local journalists and residents.

Most government officials fled Kunduz early in the day, along with foreign and local NGO workers.

 

Map of AfghanistanImage Enlarger

“The United Nations relocated all staff from Kunduz to other areas within Afghanistan,” said Dominic Medley, spokesman for the United Nations Assistance Mission to Afghanistan.

The attack is the culmination of months of intense fighting that began in April, when the militants opened up new fronts to take territory in the north.

Local sources said fighting could be heard inside the city from 3am. The Taliban attacked from four different districts: Chardara to the west, Aliabad to the south-west, Khanabad to the east and Imam Saheb to the north.

A western security adviser living in the city said the Taliban had captured Zakhel and Ali Khel villages on the vital highway leading south, connecting the city to Kabul and Mazar-i Sharif through Aliabad district.

The adviser added that the Taliban had made the biggest gains in the city’s south-west, where some local communities, already disenchanted with the government, had picked up weapons and joined the insurgents.

A local reporter who visited the frontline said poor coordination between different government units allowed the Taliban to keep advancing. He said the attack seemed to be a joint offensive by militants from Kunduz and nearby Baghlan and Takhar provinces.

In addition, since spring, scores of foreign fighters have boosted the Taliban’s offensive in the north. Many pushed into Afghanistan from Pakistan when the military there launched a campaign to rid North Waziristan of militants. Others belong to the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU), parts of which recently pledged allegiance to Islamic State.

As in other embattled parts of the country, the Afghan security forces in Kunduz are stretched thin and are mostly fighting without foreign assistance.

The US military occasionally conducts aerial attacks around the country, most recently to push back insurgents in Helmand province, but with the Taliban entering residential areas in Kunduz, they are difficult to target with heavy artillery or airpower.

For much of the day, government officials attempted to play down the Taliban’s advances, even as Taliban fighters were posting photos on social media from inside the hospital and government buildings.

Dawlat Waziri, deputy spokesman for the defence ministry, said the army had sent reinforcements from Mazar-i Sharif and Kabul to bolster the defence of the city. He declined to say how many, only that the army had sent “enough”, and that “the Taliban will surely be defeated”.

The incursion on Kunduz is more than a PR victory for the Taliban. The city is the capital of one of Afghanistan’s wealthiest provinces, also called Kunduz, which serves as a crossroads for drugs and weapons moving between the northern provinces, and acts as a gateway to Tajikistan.

As the current fighting illustrates, the government has had problems consolidating its authority in Kunduz since foreign troops pulled out in 2013.

Much of the resistance in the province against the Taliban comes from former commanders in the western-backed Northern Alliance. Some of these commanders and their private militias have long been dogged by accusations of human rights abuses, causing widespread antipathy towards the government, and in some cases sympathy for the insurgents, in areas where abuses were rife.

Lola Cecchinel, a Kabul-based analyst, said each commander had different backers in the political establishment. “Kunduz crystalises the tensions between different political factions in Kabul,” she said, and this had caused a paralysis in the government where competing factions were loath to see one militia armed and strengthened at the expense of others.

Cecchinel added: “The central government of Kabul has no clue what to do.”

 

.......................................

 

Niggy comment:

All that blood, all that treasure. Spilt for what?

Afghanistan is about to fall once again to the undefeated Taliban. When America packed up and went home, the Taliban just kept on fighting.

Still, on the bright side. The Taliban had practically eradicated Poppy growing and heroin production within Afghanistan completely before the arrival of US troops. Depending on America's reaction to the fall of Afghanistan, they may well do so again, if left alone. I wonder what the chances of that are?

October 1, 2015
8:18 am
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greeney2
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It was recaptured by afgan troops after three days, the Taliban is in retreat.

October 6, 2015
7:37 pm
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Nigfis
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The Taliban are far from in retreat. I'm not sure where you had your information, but in reality the Taliban are in control of huge swathes of Afghanistan and are advancing on most, if not all fronts.

If Fox news still say they are still in retreat, and if it were true, then the Taliban would have retreated all the way back to Mecca by now. 

Afghanistan is, has, reverted to Taliban rule. It really was all for nought. 

October 6, 2015
7:56 pm
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greeney2
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Why is it that whenever something is said that people don't like, they go on a rant about Fox news?  I quoted from an artical about this from worldwide news on the subject, having nothing to do with Fox News or Network. 

October 12, 2015
8:45 pm
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John Greenewald
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People bash Fox News because that's all they have to fall back on when saying something isn't true -- or not what it seems. That, and blaming Bush.

In regards to FoxNews -- polls (not conducted by FoxNews) show it is the most trusted news channel. Source: http://www.politico.com/story/.....oll-115887 So -- bash it if you all want -- but to those who do: you're in the minority now of being an ostrich.

Sincerely,

 

John Greenewald, Jr.

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http://www.theblackvault.com 

 

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http://www.governmentsecrets.com

 

Phone: (805) 32-VAULT

November 16, 2015
5:07 pm
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Nigfis
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John Greenewald said
People bash Fox News because that's all they have to fall back on when saying something isn't true -- or not what it seems. That, and blaming Bush.
In regards to FoxNews -- polls (not conducted by FoxNews) show it is the most trusted news channel. Source: http://www.politico.com/story/.....oll-115887 So -- bash it if you all want -- but to those who do: you're in the minority now of being an ostrich.

Only on the BV....John,  I assume you mean, the Republican's favourite? Yes?

Lets look:

"FOX News offers the most trusted network and cable news coverage, 29 percent of American voters say, when asked to compare the major TV news outlets in a Quinnipiac University National poll released today. But when network news is examined on a case-by-case basis, FOX drops in the ratings. "

That sounds a little different to the way you presented it.

 

It continues:

"When asked, "Do you trust the journalistic coverage provided by FOX News," 20 percent of U.S. voters say "a great deal" and 35 percent say "somewhat."

And

"The big winner is local television news, trusted by 19 percent of voters "a great deal" and by 52 percent "somewhat."

 

"FOX News may be the most trusted in the network and cable news race, but they all take a back seat to your local news," "

 

..............................................................

 

I seriously had imagined you wise-ing up to Faux news by now John.  Seems I was wrong. Even so, I think you may want to revise your comment:

" So -- bash it if you all want -- but to those who do: you're in the minority now of being an ostrich."

...It makes no sense whichever way up I read it. 

In the comparison chart, FOX News is definitely the Republican choice as 58 percent of GOP voters say they trust FOX the most, while 13 percent turn to CNN, with 7 percent each for NBC and CBS, 5 percent for ABC and 2 percent for MSNBC.

Only 3 percent of Democrats trust FOX the most, with 32 percent for CNN, 15 percent for NBC, 14 percent each for CBS and MSNBC and 8 percent for ABC.

 

Now then: Back on topic....

 

The Taliban Makes Gains in Afghanistan

Image Enlarger

 

In a surprisingly swift operation, the Taliban seized control over much of the Afghan city of Kunduz on Sept. 27. However, as quickly as the group gained Kunduz, it again lost it to internationally backed Afghan forces. Still, the momentary victory was the highest profile territorial gain for the Taliban since U.S.-backed forces ousted the group from power in 2001. It also highlights the substantial challenges Afghanistan's unity government faces, both politically and in terms of security. Afghan officials have provided conflicting reports on precisely how the Taliban were able to so quickly wrest control of the city from security forces (fighting lasted less than a day), though it is clear that government forces retreated from the fight. It is also evident that the balance of power is shifting in Afghanistan and that the trend is unlikely to reverse without international intervention.

The government in Kabul currently operates under a tenuous power-sharing agreement that emerged from the 2014 elections. This agreement has made the government's security efforts as important for political stability as they are for maintaining Afghanistan's territorial integrity. Kunduz is a major population center, strategically located on highways that connect directly to Kabul and Mazar-i-Sharif. But it is just one of the cities in which Afghan security forces are struggling to maintain control against the Taliban insurgency. Until winter brings its usual lull in insurgent activity, the Taliban will continue to conduct attacks and to stage similar offensives in northern provinces, including Faryab, Takhar, Baghlan, and Badakhshan. This is in addition to Taliban operations in the southern and eastern provinces of Afghanistan. Kabul's challenge will be to balance its security efforts in Kabul with those in these other areas.

Mercifully, the Taliban movement is also divided, inhibiting the organization's ability to conduct operations against the Afghan government. But without a renewed commitment by international forces, Kabul’s military and political limitations will surpass the limitations of a divided Taliban. Winter will dampen the Taliban's ability to stage offensives like the one in Kunduz, but it is clear from this active fighting season that Kabul's insurgency problem is far from over.

https://www.stratfor.com/about

 

 

So, as I said. It seems it really was all for nothing. No comments about that?

December 24, 2015
2:46 am
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Nigfis
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Meanwhile..... back in the real world....

 

Taliban take control of large parts of Sangin
Militants storm police HQ in insurgency-prone area of Helmand as official pleads for help from Afghan president

Image Enlarger

The Taliban have overrun large swaths of a key district in Helmand as the militants step up attempts to take control of the southern province that was a main focus for foreign troops in Afghanistan.

The encroachment on Sangin follows a months-long offensive in which the Taliban have taken, and in some cases held, crucial Helmand districts.

Early on Monday morning the Taliban stormed police headquarters in Sangin, a western official with knowledge of the province said, citing local sources. An airstrike, probably by Nato forces, prevented the militants from taking the administrative centre.

On Sunday, Helmand’s deputy governor, Mohammad Jan Rasoolyar, made an unusual plea to the Afghan president, Ashraf Ghani.

“I know that bringing up this issue on social media will make you very angry,” Rasoolyar wrote on Facebook. “But … Helmand stands on the brink. Ninety men have been killed in Gereshk and Sangin districts in the last two days.”

 

Government officials contradicted each other about events on the ground. Javid Faisal, spokesman for Afghan chief executive Abdullah Abdullah, denied on Twitter that Sangin had been captured but later deleted the tweet.

In a press conference on Monday morning, Helmand’s governor said the main security buildings in Sangin were under government control, as did an Afghan army spokesman.

Meanwhile, Nargis Rokhshani, a local provincial council member, warned that the entire province was in danger of falling to the Taliban.

“If the British and American forces do not help, and the government does not think about Helmand, Helmand will be in danger,” she said.

More than 100 British soldiers died in Sangin – an opium-rich and insurgency-prone district – and it still holds a central place in the international coalition’s war efforts in Afghanistan’s south. Recently, at least four UK and US special operations teams joined the fight to defend Helmand, according to a Wall Street Journal report.

Helmand is also one of the deadliest areas for Afghan security forces. Though estimates are imprecise, more than 2,000 of its soldiers have reportedly been killed or wounded in Helmand in the year up to November, according to the western official.

http://www.theguardian.com/wor.....fghanistan

 

....................................................................

 

So.

Read it and weep.

All that blood. Money. Equipment. Dead civilians......

 

And for what?

 

So what's the plan now?

More war?

Run away and declare victory?

Indiscriminate carpet-bombing of civilian wedding parties?

It has all been tried before, so who has an actual plan that doesn't include silly things like changing that whole area to glass and other such nonsense...

 

Is there anyone here?

December 26, 2015
1:13 pm
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Nigfis
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The following pdf file makes for an interesting read.

Afghanistan a Year After “Transition”: Losing the War at Every Level.

Author: Anthony H. Cordesman 

acordesman@gmail.com

January 6, 2016
1:12 pm
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greeney2
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Looks like you can't stir up any trouble anymore Nigfis.  🙂

January 7, 2016
1:49 am
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Nigfis
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greeney2 said
Looks like you can't stir up any trouble anymore Nigfis.  🙂

Difficult on an empty forum, stirring things up. Besides, and always providing you can drag yourself away from Dancing With the Stars for long enough to realise, that was never my intention. This forum is supposed to be about America's so-called War on Terrorism. Remember?

You lost. 

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