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Why Thinking of Nothing Can Be So Tiring
September 22, 2010
5:51 am
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sandra
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Alright guys I know this is a science article, but I had to throw it in here, atleast check
out the highlighted!

ScienceDaily (Sep. 21, 2010) — Ever wonder why it's such an effort to forget about work while on vacation or to silence that annoying song that's playing over and over in your head?

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Mathematicians at Case Western Reserve University may have part of the answer.

They've found that just as thinking burns energy, stopping a thought burns energy -- like stopping a truck on a downhill slope.

"Maybe this explains why it is so tiring to relax and think about nothing," said Daniela Calvetti, professor of mathematics, and one of the authors of a new brain study. Their work is published in an advanced online publication of Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism.

Opening up the brain for detailed monitoring isn't practical. So, to understand energy usage, Calvetti teamed with Erkki Somersalo, professor of mathematics, and Rossana Occhipinti, who used this work to help earn a PhD in math last year and is now a postdoctoral researcher in the department of physiology and biophysics at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine. They developed equations and statistics and built a computer model of brain metabolism.

The computer simulations for this study were obtained by using Metabolica, a software package that Calvetti and Somersalo have designed to study complex metabolic systems. The software produces a numeric rendering of the pathways linking excitatory neurons that transmit thought or inhibitory neurons that put on the brakes with star-like brain cells called astrocytes. Astrocytes cater essential chemicals and functions to both kinds of neurons.

To stop a thought, the brain uses inhibitory neurons to prevent excitatory neurons from passing information from one to another.

"The inhibitory neurons are like a priest saying, 'Don't do it,'" Calvetti said. The "priest neurons" block information by releasing gamma aminobutyric acid, commonly called GABA, which counteracts the effect of the neurotransmitter glutamate by excitatory neurons.
Laugh Laugh Laugh
Glutamate opens the synaptic gates. GABA holds the gates closed.

"The astrocytes, which are the Cinderellas of the brain, consume large amounts of oxygen mopping up and recycling the GABA and the glutamate, which is a neurotoxin," Somersalo said.

More oxygen requires more blood flow, although the connection between cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics is not fully understood yet.

All together, "It's a surprising expense to keep inhibition on," he said.

The group plans to more closely compare energy use of excitatory and inhibitory neurons by running simultaneous simulations of both processes.

The researchers are plumbing basic science but their goal is to help solve human problems.

Brain disease or damaging conditions are often difficult to diagnose until advanced stages. Most brain maladies, however, are linked to energy metabolism and understanding what is the norm may enable doctors to detect problems earlier.

The toll inhibition takes may, in particular, be relevant to neurodegenerative diseases. "And that is truly exciting" Calvetti said.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 172736.htm

“Living backwards!” Alice repeated in great
astonishment. “I never heard of such a thing!”
“—but there’s one great advantage in it, that one’s
memory works both ways.”
— Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass

September 22, 2010
6:05 am
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Ninor
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That explains why when I was trying to follow Buddhism, I would get soooo tired when I tried to meditate. The funny thing is ... when I managed to finally accomplish it, I was actually at peace. Sorta like after you do physical labor all day long, you sleep good at night.

Maybe it has to do with tiring yourself out (mentally) first.

September 22, 2010
6:43 am
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sandra
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"Ninor" wrote: That explains why when I was trying to follow Buddhism, I would get soooo tired when I tried to meditate. The funny thing is ... when I managed to finally accomplish it, I was actually at peace. Sorta like after you do physical labor all day long, you sleep good at night.

Maybe it has to do with tiring yourself out (mentally) first.

Hey thanks, right before you posted this I just got done sending an email
explaining to someone that I haven't been able to have real sleep much.
Problem is my energy at times just tells me I don't need
to sleep. When my energy isn't high its easier to peacefully rest and have silence.
Other thing I've been trying is just eating Alot and drinking alot of water, doesn't help
weigh me down with activity though. And what you are explaining is not easy for
most people to do, I can clear my mind, but I can't calm my energy at times, and its a
peaceful feeling energy, but a light one, meaning- when I hit the bed I have been going right
in the astral plane. Theres always spurts of this, so I'm hoping I'll have my more peaceful rests soon.

“Living backwards!” Alice repeated in great
astonishment. “I never heard of such a thing!”
“—but there’s one great advantage in it, that one’s
memory works both ways.”
— Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass

September 22, 2010
3:50 pm
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at1with0
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Historically, sleep has been extremely elusive for me over the last decade. I told a friend that I have insomnia, he said "well, anyone who reads more than a menu has that."

There just is so much energy and information to process.

Laugh When I first read the thread title, I thought it was going to be about non-existence :mrgreen:

In cognitive behavioral therapy, thoughts and feelings are seen as behaviors. If a behavior is ultimately doing you harm, then you're goal might be to change the behavior. As for psychological behavior, the article kinda explains why thought stopping and redirection can be so hard.

"it is easy to grow crazy"

September 22, 2010
6:18 pm
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greeney2
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Do you have sleep apnea? One sign is snoring, waking up alot, and you stop breathing. Mrs G2 watched me do it for years, and I didn't pay attention to her. You never get to the REM stage of sleep. I found out I had it and they did a sleep study on me. I now sleep with a BPAP machine that regulates positive air pressure while you sleep. I was tired in the daytime, taking knapps, sometimes just felt exhausted.

September 22, 2010
7:07 pm
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at1with0
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"greeney2" wrote: Do you have sleep apnea?

nah, but under the right circumstances I feel like I'm on drugs when I'm not. Uppers. Thus leading to insomnia.

"it is easy to grow crazy"

September 22, 2010
9:16 pm
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sandra
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"at1with0" wrote: Historically, sleep has been extremely elusive for me over the last decade. I told a friend that I have insomnia, he said "well, anyone who reads more than a menu has that."

There just is so much energy and information to process.

Laugh When I first read the thread title, I thought it was going to be about non-existence :mrgreen:

In cognitive behavioral therapy, thoughts and feelings are seen as behaviors. If a behavior is ultimately doing you harm, then you're goal might be to change the behavior. As for psychological behavior, the article kinda explains why thought stopping and redirection can be so hard.

Non-existence? Laugh

Well actually considering what we had just been discussing in the other thread of Hawkings, and the topic of "why thinking of nothing",, with a description given of "priest neurons" saying Don't do it. I found it a little humorous. Laugh

“Living backwards!” Alice repeated in great
astonishment. “I never heard of such a thing!”
“—but there’s one great advantage in it, that one’s
memory works both ways.”
— Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass

September 22, 2010
9:40 pm
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sandra
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"greeney2" wrote: Do you have sleep apnea? One sign is snoring, waking up alot, and you stop breathing. Mrs G2 watched me do it for years, and I didn't pay attention to her. You never get to the REM stage of sleep. I found out I had it and they did a sleep study on me. I now sleep with a BPAP machine that regulates positive air pressure while you sleep. I was tired in the daytime, taking knapps, sometimes just felt exhausted.

Well at times I could have part sleep apnea, as its called in scientific terms.
I don't snore or wake up alot, but I do stop breathing and it seems to be right
before I go into the astral plane. Laugh
Many people that have sleep apnea travel out of their body-
So where have you been going that you don't want to go anymore greeney?
Laugh I'm teasin ya. But really, the pause breething alot of times is before
people enter the astral realm. And people that travel in the astral realms,
they get exhausted. Because time in the astral realms moves much faster.
They can be gone for minutes, seconds, alot longer, and have it seem
as though they were gone all night. Laugh

Its good you are getting better rest, although I read alot of people don't like
the BPAP machines, because they are not very comfortable, one thing I could try
doing is elevate more- I already have a very very low heart rate, I can't imagine
what my heart rate is when I am sleeping. Day time it ranges from 40-45, I think
I have seen it even lower. I'm one of those people you can't put on a heart monitor, it alarms without a break. They have to hook up 24 hour monitoring from wires and patches all over,
but they believe it is my norm. Was suppose to have more studies done but I
haven't gone in.

“Living backwards!” Alice repeated in great
astonishment. “I never heard of such a thing!”
“—but there’s one great advantage in it, that one’s
memory works both ways.”
— Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass

September 23, 2010
1:20 am
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at1with0
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"sandra" wrote: [quote="at1with0"]Historically, sleep has been extremely elusive for me over the last decade. I told a friend that I have insomnia, he said "well, anyone who reads more than a menu has that."

There just is so much energy and information to process.

Laugh When I first read the thread title, I thought it was going to be about non-existence :mrgreen:

In cognitive behavioral therapy, thoughts and feelings are seen as behaviors. If a behavior is ultimately doing you harm, then you're goal might be to change the behavior. As for psychological behavior, the article kinda explains why thought stopping and redirection can be so hard.

Non-existance? Laugh

Well actually considering what we had just been discussing in the other thread of Hawkings, and the topic of "why thinking of nothing",, with a description given of "priest neurons" saying Don't do it. I found it a little humorous. Laugh

gotta watch the priest neuron interaction with newly-formed neurons. 😕

"it is easy to grow crazy"

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