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Whale Oil Beef Hooked.
October 28, 2009
3:34 pm
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rath
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World cuts southern bluefin tuna quota 20 per cent

The world's southern bluefin tuna fishing industry has just taken a hit worth hundreds of millions of dollars. Following a major international meeting on South Korea's Jeju Island late last week, quotas have been cut worldwide by 20 per cent, and Australia - the largest fisher of southern bluefin tuna - must now cut its catch by 30 per cent.

This has been welcomed by scientists who've warned that this valuable fish is now perilously close to extinction.

The worldwide fishing quota of southern bluefin tuna has been cut by 20 per cent, following difficult negotiations at last week's meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Southern Bluefin Tuna in South Korea.

Stock levels of the southern bluefin - which have been steeply declining - are now dangerously low, with a report presented to the Commission members said to indicate stocks are at five per cent of 1940's levels.

The Commission, which plays a vital role in managing southern bluefin stock levels, agreed to a 20 per cent cut in the total allowable catch of the fish around the world, taking the global quota down to just under 19,000 tonnes, in order to give the fish a reprieve and chance for recovery.

The Commission decided that key southern bluefin fishing countries, including Australia (which pulls in around 40 per cent of the world's catch), are to reduce their average catch rates by 25 per cent over the next two years in order to help achieve this.

Japan to feel Aussie anger over tuna catch

http://www.atimes.com/oceania/.....2Ah01.html

June 12, 1999

CANBERRA - Australia will launch immediate legal action against Japan to try to save threatened southern bluefin tuna stocks from overfishing. Prime Minister John Howard is also to lodge a personal protest during a visit to Tokyo next month.

Australia, New Zealand and Japan had previously agreed on strict limits to protect southern bluefin tuna, whose stocks have become so depleted by overfishing it is now close to being listed as officially endangered. Japan, however, flouted this agreement last year through an ''experimental fishing program'' (EFP), the same device it uses to get around the international ban on whaling.

Under the EFP, Japan took an additional 1,400 tons or 25percent above its quota of the highly prized fish and last week unilaterally announced its decision to repeat the program this year.

With furious protests from Australia and New Zealand going unanswered, Agriculture and Fisheries Minister Mark Vaile announced Australia would commence international legal action to try to protect the tuna stocks.

''I regret that our views were disregarded by Japan and that despite our informal protests, the unilateral EFP has been resumed,'' he said. ''I understand there are several Japanese long-liners nowfishing in the Southern Ocean not far from our fishing zone. The government has decided to act decisively."

This action includes an indefinite ban on Japanese boats entering Australian ports or fishing inside the Australian fishing zone. Vaile said overfishing placed Australia's A$170 million(U.S.$111.66 million) tuna export industry and 3,000 jobs at risk.

Foreign Minister Alexander Downer also warned the dispute could harm otherwise good relations between Australia and Japan. ''It is disappointing that it has come to this,'' he said in a statement. ''Japan has significantly ratcheted up what was previously a minor irritant in an otherwise strong relationship. This is not an issue Australia can, or will, back away from."

Greenpeace, which has long campaigned for the southern bluefin tuna to be placed on the endangered list, applauded the government's action. ''We congratulate the Australian government on this decision,'' Greenpeace fisheries campaigner Denise Boyd said. ''It's the right decision to take.'' She called on the government to go further by immediately listing the tuna on the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.

http://www.buzzle.com/articles.....25685.html

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=1818

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=1358

March 5, 2010
2:38 pm
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REUTERS

EU likely to support bluefin tuna trade ban

2/20/2010

BRUSSELS: Europe looks set to support an unprecedented ban on the international trade in bluefin tuna, a species driven towards extinction by insatiable demand from Japan, where a single fish can fetch $100,000.

Scientists say stocks of the Atlantic bluefin — which can grow to the size of a horse — have fallen by more than 80 percent over the last 40 years to around 3.2 million.

European fishermen catch the fish when they congregate in tightly packed shoals to breed in the Mediterranean, preventing stocks from recovering.

EU fisheries commissioner Maria Damanaki will propose to the bloc’s 27 member states on Monday that they support listing the fish as endangered under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), officials say.

But she will also suggest a one-year delay to the ban on fishing that normally follows an ‘endangered’ listing.

March 5, 2010
2:40 pm
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rath
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MARCH 02, 2010

EU-Japan At Odds Over Ban on Bluefin Tuna

Bluefin tuna is a prized commodity in Japan.

In fact the country has the world's largest appetite for this expensive fish . consuming 40 percent of the global catch, But this abundant supply may well be coming to an end.

The European Commission is pushing to place a global ban on fishing Atlantic bluefin tuna by 2011, It claims that overfishing is leading to sharply dwindling stocks driving the bluefin to near extinction.

The Commission is trying to seek approval for a formal proposal of the ban from at least two-thirds of the EU governments prior to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species set to open in Doha, Qatar on March 13th.

The ultimate goal is to list the bluefin tuna as an endangered species.
Japan has appealed to the Commission to reconsider its plans.
Meanwhile, the Asian country is facing an uphill battle on another front whale hunting.
Especially with New Zealand considering joining Australia in the crackdown.

"If the diplomatic solution fails and the only available option is a court action, at that time we'll consider whether we will join Australia."

The barbaric culling of whales has been a subject of widespread protests and Australia has been threatening to take the case to the International Court of Justice.

Commercial whaling was banned in the 1980s by the International Whaling Commission.
But countries like Norway, Iceland, the Philippines and Japan still whale under the name of scientific research.

In Japan, most of the whales are said to end up on restaurant tables.
"We will not halt whaling. It is not illegal to catch whales based on the guidelines outlined by the International Whaling Commission."

Critics say that Japan is now being confronted with a culinary double whammy.
Officials are said to be making diplomatic efforts to avoid the worst case scenario.
Park Jong-hong Arirang News.

March 5, 2010
2:44 pm
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United States Supports Bluefin Tuna Trade Ban

WASHINGTON, DC, March 4, 2010 (ENS) - A proposal to ban all international commercial trade of Atlantic bluefin tuna at this month's meeting of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, CITES, has the support of the United States, a senior U.S. fisheries official said Wednesday.

"The United States continues to have serious concerns about the long-term viability of either the fish or the fishery," said Tom Strickland, assistant secretary of the interior for fish and wildlife and parks, who will head the U.S. delegation to the upcoming Conference of Parties of the 175-nation treaty in Doha, Qatar.

The Atlantic bluefin tuna is highly prized, especially for high-end sushi and sashimi, and a single fish can sell for tens of thousands of dollars. The Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean bluefin population has declined more than 80 percent since 1970. Bluefin are threatened by overharvesting, which includes illegal, unregulated, and unreported fishing.

If adopted at the CITES meeting, the proposal by Monaco would place Atlantic bluefin on Appendix I of the treaty, under which commercial trade in the species is not allowed. Non-commercial trade would be allowed by permit only.

Strickland initially announced support for the Monaco's CITES proposal last October, but left open the possibility that the United States could change its position if the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas, ICCAT, strengthened management and compliance measures during its November 2009 meeting.

"We recognize that the parties to ICCAT took some unprecedented steps," said Strickland. But, he said, the 2010 bluefin quota level adopted by ICCAT is not as low as the United States believes is needed, and he also pointed to "serious compliance problems" with international bluefin tuna conservation measures.

"We understand the frustration of our U.S. fishermen who have followed the scientific recommendations and regulatory provisions of ICCAT for many years while their counterparts in the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean have often overfished and engaged in ineffective management," Strickland said.

Conservation groups welcome the U.S. position. "The U.S. has a vested interest in this issue, as a fishing nation of Atlantic bluefin tuna - so if the U.S. can see the bigger picture and back the international trade ban proposal for the long-term survival of a species and a fishery, all countries can and should do so," said WWF tuna expert Dr. Sergi Tudela.

The European Commission declared its support for a ban in February but wants any ban to be delayed for 12 months to wait for more scientific information to assess the adequacy of any measures adopted by ICCAT when it meets in November 2010.

The United States is not asking for any conditions or delays of the ban, unlike France and the European Commission.

"WWF now urges EU member countries to follow the U.S. lead and drop any conditions in their own backing for the international trade ban, and calls on all CITES members to support the Appendix I proposal at the Doha Conference of the Parties," said Dr. Tudela. "The time to save Atlantic bluefin tuna is now, and with a concerted global effort, we can do this."

The London-based nonprofit SeaWeb is pleased with the U.S. announcement. "SeaWeb applauds the United States for its strong support of trade protection for bluefin tuna, and for its leadership in proposing six species of sharks and red and pink coral for CITES protection," said Kristian Teleki, who is SeaWeb's vice president for science initiatives. "The Doha meeting represents a unique opportunity for meaningful trade measures to be put in place for these valuable marine species."

The Atlantic bluefin tuna is subject to a massive international trade, including a high incidence of illegal trade of the East Atlantic and Mediterranean stock, and ICCAT has the statistics to prove it.

Japan, the main consumer of Atlantic bluefin tuna, reported to ICCAT the import of 32,356 tonnes of processed Atlantic bluefin for 2007.

By contrast, ICCAT set the legal quota of 29,500 tonnes for that year. And ICCAT estimated real catches of Atlantic bluefin tuna in 2007 potentially reaching 61,000 tonnes.

The maximum annual catch recommended by ICCAT's Standing Committee on Research and Statistics to prevent collapse and initiate rebuilding for that bluefin stock, is estimated at between 8,500 and 15,000 tonnes.

Today, bluefin tuna are literally being eaten out of existence, but if CITES Parties approve the Appendix I listing, Atlantic bluefin will disappear from most sushi plates.

That would be just fine with a growing number of celebrities who might otherwise order bluefin tuna sushi, served on rice, or sashimi, which is the raw fish served in thin slices without rice.

A statement in support of the bluefin tuna ban has been signed by actors Michael Douglas and Ted Danson; model Elle MacPherson; former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan; European diplomat and politician Javier Solana; and 46 other public figures.

Supporting groups include: Greenpeace, Madrid-based Ecologistas en Accion, Latin American regional NGO MarViva, Oceana, and The Pew Environment Group.

"The Obama administration's decision to support a CITES Appendix I listing of Atlantic bluefin tuna could be a real game changer for the species," said Susan Lieberman, director of international policy at the Pew Environment Group. "Other governments can either join Monaco and the United States in boldly supporting the conservation of bluefin tuna, sharks and other marine species or they can yield to commercial fishing interests that focus more on short-term profits than a sustainable future for both fish and local fishing communities."

Strickland said, "The U.S. government is committed to working with our many international partners to continue to rebuild Atlantic bluefin tuna and ensure sustained conservation and management of the species into the future."

March 6, 2010
6:51 am
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rath
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Japan says won't comply with bluefin tuna ban

(Reuters) - Japan will not comply if a total ban on international trade in Atlantic bluefin tuna is imposed, a government official was quoted as saying on Thursday, as support grows for the unprecedented trade halt.

Japan

Bluefin tuna is a highly valued fish worth up to $200-$300 per kg but stocks have depleted rapidly. It is particularly sought-after in Japan, where a single fish can fetch as much a $100,000.

"If worse comes to worst, Japan will have no choice but to lodge its reservations," Senior Vice Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Masahiko Yamada, was quoted as saying by Kyodo news agency.

Some 175 countries are due to vote on 40 proposals at a meeting of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) in Doha, Qatar, on March 13-25. The proposals include whether to list bluefin tuna as endangered.

Monaco had proposed protecting bluefin tuna by listing it under appendix I of the CITES.

A two-thirds majority is required for it to be accepted and Japan is expected to fight hard against the ban.

France and Italy have also recently reversed their opposition to a ban. The European Union's executive said last month that Atlantic bluefin tuna should be protected from being pushed to extinction by Japanese sushi lovers.

(Reporting by Yoko Nishikawa; Editing by Paul Tait)

March 6, 2010
2:03 pm
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mael
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So ............. It's those antipodals who are the worst murderers of bluefin?

Don'tcha know those bluefin are to the sea as trees are to the land ... They are massively, incweddibly storers of carbon. 🙂 🙄

Save the 'roos!

March 7, 2010
9:00 am
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rath
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"mael" wrote: So ............. It's those antipodals who are the worst murderers of bluefin?

Don'tcha know those bluefin are to the sea as trees are to the land ... They are massively, incweddibly storers of carbon. 🙂 🙄

Save the 'roos!

Whats your point mael.

Don'tcha know those bluefin are to the sea as trees are to the land ... They are massively, incweddibly storers of carbon. 🙂 🙄

Yes .. i agree & thats why Japan is being forced to stop fishing Bluefin Tuna in the waters of Europe & the South Pacific.

Japan can do as it pleases in its own waters.

Just stay the hell out of ours.

Granted our waters are cleaner & have more fish stocks then the polluted & over fished waters of japan.

& that is why you envy our waters ........ but a'las they are our waters & not japans ..... so japan can go take a running jump.

March 7, 2010
12:28 pm
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mael
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"rath" wrote: Whats your point mael.

* That you are a hypocrite spewing a load of bullsh!t.

Yes .. i agree

* No prizes for guessing that one right. 🙄 🙄 🙄

& thats why Japan is being forced to stop fishing Bluefin Tuna in the waters of Europe & the South Pacific.

* Is Japan telling yeuze to get-stuffed anything to do with being forced to do anything? Laugh Laugh Laugh

Japan can do as it pleases in its own waters.

* Most kind, I'm sure. 🙂

Just stay the hell out of ours.

* Japan doesn't hunt in yeuse waters. - No matter how much you whine ... and whine ... and whine about it. 🙄 🙄 🙄

Granted our waters are cleaner & have more fish stocks then the polluted & over fished waters of japan.

* Tell me about your Great Barrier Reef. Why is it essentially dead? And I would imagine you bathing in the sea is more pollution than the entire world's eco-system can accommodate.

& that is why you envy our waters ........ but a'las they are our waters & not japans ..... so japan can go take a running jump.

* Me? Why me? I couldn't give a flying ruck. And neither does Japan by the looks of it.

* More Adi Gil please. Yum yum! 😀

March 7, 2010
12:37 pm
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rath
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"mael" wrote: [quote="rath"]Whats your point mael.

* That you are a hypocrite spewing a load of bullsh!t.

Yes .. i agree

* No prizes for guessing that one right. 🙄 🙄 🙄

& thats why Japan is being forced to stop fishing Bluefin Tuna in the waters of Europe & the South Pacific.

* Is Japan telling yeuze to get-stuffed anything to do with being forced to do anything? Laugh Laugh Laugh

Japan can do as it pleases in its own waters.

* Most kind, I'm sure. 🙂

Just stay the hell out of ours.

* Japan doesn't hunt in yeuse waters. - No matter how much you whine ... and whine ... and whine about it. 🙄 🙄 🙄

Granted our waters are cleaner & have more fish stocks then the polluted & over fished waters of japan.

* Tell me about your Great Barrier Reef. Why is it essentially dead? And I would imagine you bathing in the sea is more pollution than the entire world's eco-system can accommodate.

& that is why you envy our waters ........ but a'las they are our waters & not japans ..... so japan can go take a running jump.

* Me? Why me? I couldn't give a flying ruck. And neither does Japan by the looks of it.

* More Adi Gil please. Yum yum! 😀

Embarassed It looks like you have got your panties in a twist again mael.

March 7, 2010
1:26 pm
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mael
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"rath" wrote: Embarassed It looks like you have got your panties in a twist again mael.

* To you? I'm not at all surprised.

* I deal with small children on a daily basis so I am very tolerent of your fanciful ideas and dreaming.

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