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Quantum Teleportation Sends Information 143 Kilometers
September 6, 2012
5:16 pm
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at1with0
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http://tech.slashdot.org/story/12/09/06 ... eedfetcher

"Scientists from around the world have collaborated to achieve quantum teleportation over 143 kilometers in free space . Quantum information was sent between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife. Quantum teleportation is not how it is made out in Star Trek though. Instead of sending an object (in this case a photon) from one location to another; the information of its quantum state is sent, making a photon on the other end look identical to the original .'Teleportation across 143 kilometres is a crucial milestone in this research, since that is roughly the minimum distance between the ground and orbiting satellites.' It is the hope of the research team that this experiment will lead to commercial use of quantum teleportation to interact with satellites and ground stations. This will increase the efficiency of satellite communication and help with the expansion of quantum internet usage. The full paper on the experiment can be found [note] in the journal Nature."

"it is easy to grow crazy"

September 8, 2012
3:41 am
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rath
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http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/sci.....049048.stm

Your telling me that over ten years has past and they are still doing the same experiment.

no wonder mankind is doomed.

September 8, 2012
4:41 am
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at1with0
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"rath" wrote: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/sci.....049048.stm

Your telling me that over ten years has past and they are still doing the same experiment.

no wonder mankind is doomed.

From your link:

Scientists at the Australian National University (ANU) made a beam of light disappear in one place and reappear in another a short distance away.

I'd say 143 km is an improvement.

"it is easy to grow crazy"

September 8, 2012
7:10 am
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rath
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"at1with0" wrote: I'd say 143 km is an improvement.

barley .......... as the distance is neither here nor there.

they aren't sending an object over a longer distance. they are just doing the same experiment an creating a photocopy or fax from further away.

Thus in the same way, if i send a fax or e-mail from new york to Washington.

& then somebody else sends a fax or e-mail from new york to Sydney, by sending there e-mail or fax further then mine has no net effect on the technology used.

It's the same process regardless of distance.

ergo, it's the same research, & the 'Teleportation across 143 kilometers means nothing ...... as they have improved the technology nill ....

if you make a phone call to somebody across the road, or to somebody on the other side of the world.
It Changes not the process nor the technology.

Distance is irrelevant.

The Australian team, who were the first in the world to achieve quantum teleportation over ten years ago
showed back then that the same process can be used over a greater distance so the new test at 143 kilometers means little.

& will mean even less if another team replicates the Australian research over a longer distance ....... say 144 kilometers. 🙄

September 8, 2012
5:33 pm
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at1with0
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"rath" wrote: Distance is irrelevant.

Laugh

"it is easy to grow crazy"

September 10, 2012
5:29 am
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rath
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"at1with0" wrote: [quote="rath"]Distance is irrelevant.

Laugh

Well i see your knowledge on this subject is some what limited.

So by all means, do pray-tell.

How does distance make a difference here, when neither team ........... Actually teleported anything at all.
( the Australian team in a world first over 10 years ago ) nor the team in your post who just replicated the Australian research,

they just made a copy of an object in one place be recreated in another.
Fax machines have been doing the same thing for decades, & e-mail & text message does much the same thing today.

The Australian team was just the first to do it with light, & that was the important fact ..... & not the distance involved.

Being able to send encoded parcels of light to secure important information.

Hell ...... they even used this research as a bases of the ring technology in the show Stargate.

September 10, 2012
5:54 pm
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at1with0
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Information was sent. The information has to at least reach satellite range to be practical. So whether the information was sent "a short distance" or was sent 143 km, there is a huge difference in terms of its practicality.

"it is easy to grow crazy"

September 13, 2012
12:12 pm
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rath
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"at1with0" wrote: Information was sent. The information has to at least reach satellite range to be practical. So whether the information was sent "a short distance" or was sent 143 km, there is a huge difference in terms of its practicality.

Yes .... So.

Your assumption is based on the fact you assume that they could not send the info, in this case a beam of light further than they did.

That assumption is wrong.

the distance traveled is defined by the technology .......... & the technology has not changed since the Australian researches first achieved this over ten years ago.

like i said already.

Your assumption that the Australian team ( could not ) rather than did not send the beam of light any further than they did, is wrong.

Just as your assumption that the new team who have merely replicated the Australian research, could not have sent their beam of light much further than 143 kilometers.

Show me what you think ... limits our/their ability to send a beam of light further then 143 kilometers ....... 🙄

What makes you think 143 kilometers is the maximum the technology allows.

keeping in mind they aren't actually sending anything ... anywhere.

Like i said ..... Distance is irrelevant.

( unless your just stealing another country's research, & claiming it as your own. You know, in the hope of getting a big fat cash grant from some stupid rich American )

September 13, 2012
6:50 pm
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They did not send a beam of light. Did you not read the article I linked to? They sent information. It says they didn't send a photon in the second or third sentence. That would violate the speed of light barrier and would be HUGE news; they didn't send photons.

I don't think we're even playing the same sport here if you don't think distance matters. That's like saying the size of a transistor doesn't matter.

:silent:

"it is easy to grow crazy"

September 14, 2012
9:18 am
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rath
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"at1with0" wrote: They did not send a beam of light. Did you not read the article I linked to? They sent information. It says they didn't send a photon in the second or third sentence. That would violate the speed of light barrier and would be HUGE news; they didn't send photons.

I don't think we're even playing the same sport here

No i don't this we are playing the same sport.

im playing contact sport & your playing tiddly winks.

The information they sent, is the same information the original team, the Australian team sent over ten years ago. ..... catch up son.

Monday, 17 June, 2002,
Australian teleport breakthrough
Lab, ANU

By Dr David Whitehouse
BBC News Online science editor
It is a long way from Star Trek, but teleportation - the disembodiment of an object in one location and its reconstruction in another - has been successfully carried out in a physics lab in Australia.

Scientists at the Australian National University (ANU) made a beam of light disappear in one place and reappear in another a short distance away.

The achievement confirms that in theory teleportation is possible, at least for sub-atomic particles; whether it can be done for larger systems, such as atoms, remains to be seen.

The more likely applications will come in telecommunications, enabling much faster transfer of data and the use of encryption that can never be broken.

Will we ever be able to teleport humans?

Teleportation has been one of the hottest topics among physicists working in quantum mechanics - the study of the fundamental structure of matter.

'Spooky interaction'

The Australian researchers have exploited a phenomenon called "quantum entanglement", which links the properties of two photons of light created at the same time. Einstein called it a "spooky interaction".

What it means is that two photons can be created and sent to different places. It is possible to force one photon into a specific quantum mechanical state and, because the two photons are connected in some way, the other photon will instantaneously take up a complementary state.

At first sight, entanglement offers the prospect of sending a signal faster than the speed of light. But a closer look at what is actually possible shows that this will not work because of the limits of what can be known about quantum mechanical systems and how such information is relayed.

But it may offer the prospect of a Star Trek-style transporter.

'Exciting applications'

Using quantum entanglement, ANU physicist Ping Koy Lam has disassembled laser light at one end of an optical communications system and recreated a replica just a metre away.

An encoded signal is embedded in an input stream of photons, which is entangled with another beam.

Elsewhere in the lab, the beam of photons and the associated signal is reconstituted.
[/color]
"What we have demonstrated here is that we can take billions of photons, destroy them simultaneously, and then recreate them in another place," Dr Lam says.

"The applications of teleportation for computers and communications over the next decade are very exciting," he adds.

Body movement

Quantum teleportation could make encrypted or coded information 100% secure, Dr Lam said, because even if intercepted the message would be unintelligible unless it was intended for a specific recipient.

Quantum teleporting is problematic for humans because the original is destroyed in the process of creating the replica.

Quantum Teleportation Sends Information 143 Kilometers
Posted by timothy on Thursday September 06, @09:28AM
from the like-a-coal-mine-in-the-canaries dept.
SchrodingerZ writes "Scientists from around the world have collaborated to achieve quantum teleportation over 143 kilometers in free space. Quantum information was sent between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife. Quantum teleportation is not how it is made out in Star Trek, though. Instead of sending an object (in this case a photon) from one location to another; the information of its quantum state is sent, making a photon on the other end look identical to the original. 'Teleportation across 143 kilometres is a crucial milestone in this research, since that is roughly the minimum distance between the ground and orbiting satellites.' It is the hope of the research team that this experiment will lead to commercial use of quantum teleportation to interact with satellites and ground stations. This will increase the efficiency of satellite communication and help with the expansion of quantum internet usage. The full paper on the experiment can be found [note] in the journal Nature."

It's the god dam iformation that forms the beam of light that both teams have sent.

They sent the information that makes the beam of light from one place to another, thus ......

They recreated the light in another location by sending it's quantum makeup ( the information ).

holly Moses.

were playing a different sport alright son.

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