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Gulf oil spill
May 6, 2010
5:42 am
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bionic
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Has anyone posted about this yet?

If so, sorry I missed it.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/299080
How horrible, huh?

Poor New Orleans..and they were just coming back after Katrina.

Island Girl, You out there? Thinking of you and yours, lady!!

What a mess (literally)

Buy up some frozen shrimp now, folks..it's about to get .. really expensive.
🙄

Willie Wonka quotes..
What is this Wonka, some kind of funhouse?
Why? Are you having fun?
A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men.
We are the music makers, we are the dreamers of dreams

May 6, 2010
8:27 am
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sandra
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Yeah I've been watching this, its a mess.
At one point they thought they had alot less oil leaking
than what was actually coming out, I know they were burning it,
but this is just too large of a spill to not cause havoc. Watched an
interview with a represenative from the Coast Guard, she didn't
seem so confident in her responses that they were making leverage
at the time.

“Living backwards!” Alice repeated in great
astonishment. “I never heard of such a thing!”
“—but there’s one great advantage in it, that one’s
memory works both ways.”
— Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass

May 6, 2010
3:28 pm
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Aquatank
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It might help the clean up to donate pethair & pantyhose, if anyone has a bunch lying around.
http://inhabitat.com/2010/05/04/donate- ... oil-spill/

May 6, 2010
3:41 pm
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BloodStone
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It will certainly help Obama,and the lefties kill whats left of our oil independence dreams. 🙄

great timing too...

BloodStone...

If it were raining hookers, I'd get hit by a fag.

May 6, 2010
3:45 pm
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Aquarian
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I think this man-made disaster is morally reprehensible. It represents exactly the kind of monster that capitalism creates. This was not an accident, or a mistake. It was a calculated, systemic-based decision to produce a profit-margin. This is the same multinational publicly traded company that represents US, European and Middle-Eastern shareholders and investors that lobbied extensively for deregulation and did so successfully with the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Now, the result is almost irreversible damage to livelihoods in the Gulf community that depend on the ocean for income, which will inevitably lead to a rise in alcoholism, depression and suicide as it did when the Exxon-Valdez spill happened in 1989. Everything about this spill is terrible; the effect it will have on the approximate 5,000 dolphins that live in that part of the water in reproductive season, to the birds, to the sea turtles, the fish, the oysters, clam, shrimp, the US' only reef, etc. The fact that BP REFUSED to install a safety leverage switch shows how much multinational corporations are willing to avoid in safety/regulation costs in order for them not to increase their monetary "losses". The fact of the matter is that they never had a significant quarterly loss and in the first quarter of 2010 they reported a $10.9 billion profit margin.

What should happen is that the people in charge, which means a conglomerate of Halliburton and BP execs should be arrested for this crime against the environment and the livelihoods of working-class citizens. There is also a case for seizure to be made here. That is why BP's assets should be seized immediately and used to provide comprehensive compensation and relief for those who have lost their jobs and whose livelihoods, homes and communities have been severely harmed or destroyed, and to clean up and restore the environment. It is called STRICT LIABILITY! This will not happen under this cynical administration because the Obama campaign received tons of cash from BP lobbying groups. Not only that, but his continued appeasement of the oil companies is disgusting. The fact that the Obama Administration sheltered Deep Water Horizon co. from regulatory requirements for the oil rig should be a sign that this administration is still a corporatist administration (http://wsws.org/articles/2010/.....-m06.shtml)

Again, the psychopathology of industrial civilization shines...or in this case, spills, flows and blackens.

The Few assume to be the deputies, but they are often only the despoilers of the Many.
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

May 6, 2010
3:50 pm
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Aquarian
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Feds Let BP Avoid Filing Blowout Plan for Gulf Rig

NEW ORLEANS - Petrochemical giant BP didn't file a plan to specifically handle a major oil spill from an uncontrolled blowout at its Deepwater Horizon project because the federal agency that regulates offshore rigs changed its rules two years ago to exempt certain projects in the central Gulf region, according to an Associated Press review of official records.

The Minerals Management Service, an arm of the Interior Department known for its cozy relationship with major oil companies, says it issued the rule relief because some of the industrywide mandates weren't practical for all of the exploratory and production projects operating in the Gulf region.

The blowout rule, the fact that it was lifted in April 2008 for rigs that didn't fit at least one of five conditions, and confusion about whether the BP Deepwater Horizon project was covered by the regulation, caught the attention of Interior Secretary Ken Salazar.

Following a tour of a boom operation in Gulf Shores, Ala., Salazar said Wednesday that he understood BP was required to file plans for coping with a blowout at the well that failed.

"My understanding is that everything was in its proper place," said Salazar.

But an AP review of government and BP documents found that the company had not filed a specific comprehensive blowout plan for the rig that exploded April 20, leaving 11 workers dead and spewing an estimated 210,000 gallons of oil a day.

Instead, a site-specific exploration plan filed by BP in February 2009 stated that it was "not required" to file "a scenario for a potential blowout" of the Deepwater well.

When questioned about the exemption claim, BP spokesman William Salvin said provisions for handling a blowout incident were actually included in the firm's 582-page region oil spill plan, though he had difficulty pointing to specific passages.

He later maintained that the Deepwater location was not subject to the blowout scenario requirements because it triggered none of the conditions cited in the MMS's April 2008 notice to operators about a loosening of the rules.

Still, Salvin insisted the company was prepared to handle a blowout and catastrophic spill at the project through provisions included in its regional plan.

"We have a plan that has sufficient detail in it to deal with a blowout," Salvin said, while acknowledging that the ongoing crisis at the Deepwater site is "uncontrolled."

The lack of a specific plan for the Deepwater project raises questions about whether BP could have been better prepared to deal with the ongoing disaster and whether MMS is fulfilling its regulatory oversight.

Robert Wiygul, an Ocean Springs, Miss., environmental lawyer, said the lack of a blowout scenario "is kind of an outrageous omission, because you're drilling in extremely deep waters, where by definition you're looking for very large reservoirs to justify the cost."

"If the MMS was allowing companies to drill in this ultra-deep situation without a blowout scenario, then it seems clear they weren't doing the job they were tasked with," he said. "The MMS can't change the law just by telling people that they don't have to comply with it. I think it really indicates that somebody at MMS was asleep at the switch on this."

Brendan Cummings, a Joshua Tree, Calif.-based lawyer for the Center for Biological Diversity, said the exploration plan submitted by BP for Deepwater Horizon failed to adequately analyze the project's oil spill risks. Cummings has filed a notice of intent to sue the government over another offshore drilling operation, by Royal Dutch Shell in Alaska.

"The technology used on the now-sunken Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf was supposed to be the most advanced in the world, including various mechanisms to prevent or cap a blowout," Cummings wrote in the filing. "None of these mechanisms worked, and the state-of-the-art technology completely failed to stop the spill."

In its 2009 exploration plan for the Deepwater Horizon site, BP strongly discounted the possibility of a catastrophic accident. Similarly, Shell's environmental impact analysis for its Beaufort Sea drilling plan asserts that the possibility of a "large liquid hydrocarbon spill ... is regarded as too remote and speculative to be considered a reasonably foreseeable impacting event."

The Deepwater Horizon disaster is not the first time MMS has been criticized as being too close to the oil industry.

In 2008, the Interior Department took disciplinary action against eight MMS employees who accepted lavish gifts, partied and - in some cases - had sex with employees from the energy companies they regulated. An investigation cited a "culture of substance abuse and promiscuity" involving employees in the agency's Denver office.

MMS workers were given upgraded ethics training.

Associated Press Writer Richard T. Pienciak reported from Atlanta; AP Writer Jay Reeves reported from Gulf Shores, Ala.

http://www.commondreams.org/he.....2010/05/06

The Few assume to be the deputies, but they are often only the despoilers of the Many.
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

May 6, 2010
3:56 pm
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BloodStone
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and we should be forced back to live in the stone age too right ? 🙄

I agree that they should be punished , and forced to pay for the clean up.

But we as a nation need to drill for oil or we will never move forward. We will soon be moving backwards, which is what the current administration wants to do anyway.

Obama himself has mentioned many times, that his cap , and trade bill would cause energy costs to skyrocket, and rightly so he added. He wants to weed us off these energy sources. That's great, but there is still nothing that is capable of replacing these sources.

sooooo? now what, we go back to living like the Amish ? don't drive cars anymore? what is you're answer Aquarian? how do we move forward with no energy?

or is that the lefty mentality, we need to stay with the other third world crap hole nations, and stop growing. It's really starting to get obvious. 🙄

BloodStone...

If it were raining hookers, I'd get hit by a fag.

May 6, 2010
4:12 pm
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Aquarian
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Bloodstone, you continue to fall for the fossil fuel industry's clap trap about the need for us to be continually dependent on oil, coal, among other things when it's a fallacy to adhere to that. If anything, this disastrous spill should be a testimony to the dangers of offshore drilling- environmentally calamitous and economically unsound considering the amount of oil supply that lies in the offshore regions as per US consumption rate.

I think one of the most promising sources of alternative energy the US should be focusing on is wind.

http://www.awea.org/faq/wwt_basics.html ... 20generate

http://www.otherpower.com/othe.....wind.shtml

http://www.nrgsystems.com/AboutWind/Ben ... nergy.aspx

The Few assume to be the deputies, but they are often only the despoilers of the Many.
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

May 6, 2010
5:16 pm
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BloodStone
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Wind is a non starter.

I work in the waste management business, everyone wants to get rid of their garbage ,but they don't want the landfill or incinerator in their back yard. Same goes for wind. No one wants those monstrosoties in their yard.

No to mention the cost of maintinence , and upkeep for one of those stupid windmills.It's way too costly to be affective. Same as solar, it's a great technology , but too exspensive, and costly to reapir , and they break all the time.

so you're dreams of not having an oil based lifestyle is not economical or wise.

BloodStone...

If it were raining hookers, I'd get hit by a fag.

May 6, 2010
5:45 pm
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rath
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This is how the russians, see it !!!

Why Do So Many Bad Things Keep Happening To The United States?

The Economic Collapse
By Michael Snyder

At a time when the American economy is already reeling like a drunken sailor, the United States is being hit by what seems like an endless parade of horrible disasters that threaten to push the fragile financial system over the edge. The massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico that is now destroying not only the the entire economy of the Gulf Coast but also the entire way of life for hundreds of thousands of people is getting all the headlines right now, but it is far from the only major crisis that has hit the United States recently. The old saying, "when it rains it pours", is certainly applicable to the United States right now. Already faced with some of the biggest economic problems in a generation, America is also being forced to deal with horrifying natural disasters, rapidly growing environmental nightmares and agricultural problems that could end up being absolutely unprecedented. So why do so many bad things keep happening to the United States? Does there come a point when the economic damage from all of these disasters just becomes too much? After all, how many body blows can the "biggest economy in the world" take and still remain standing?

Consider just a few of the major disasters that the U.S. is having to deal with....

The Gulf Of Mexico Oil Spill
Industry experts are now saying that the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico could be increasing at a rate of 25,000 barrels a day - five times the U.S. government's current estimate. In fact,
Barack Obama is calling the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico a potentially unprecedented
environmental disaster.

So how much is this disaster going to cost?

Well, estimates vary at this point, but it is being reported that some analysts are already projecting that the costs related to the oil spill drifting toward Louisiana from a well operated by BP in the Gulf of Mexico could exceed 14 billion dollars.

The cost to the fishing industry in Louisiana alone could top 3 billion dollars, and it is being projected that the tourism industry in Florida could lose even more than that.

This is rapidly shaping up as one of the biggest environmental nightmares (perhaps the biggest) that the United States has ever had to face. In fact, there are some who are saying that this incident has already eclipsed the 1989 Exxon Valdez incident as the worst U.S. oil disaster in history.

Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal is warning that the oil spill in the Gulf threatens the very way of life of people in his state. As bad as Hurricane Katrina was, there are those who are already claiming that this disaster will be worse than Hurricane Katrina for the region, because it will literally take years for this mess to be cleaned up. In fact, there is a very real possibility that the fishing industry may be crippled for generations by this disaster.

The Disappearance Of The Honeybees

For the fourth year in a row in the United States, more than a third of all bee colonies have failed to survive the winter.

To be more precise, according to the annual survey by the Apiary Inspectors of America and the U.S. government's Agricultural Research Service, the number of managed honeybee colonies in the United States fell by 33.8% last winter.

Needless to say, this is not a good trend.

In fact, it could quickly turn into an unmitigated disaster as it is estimated that a third of all that we eat depends upon honeybee pollination.

Are you starting to get the picture?

Most flowering plants require insects for pollination. The most effective insect for pollination is the honeybee.

Without honeybees, we are going to be in a world of hurt.

According to WorldNetDaily, the following is a list of just some of the crops that depend on honeybees: almonds, apples, apricots, avocados, blueberries, boysenberries, cherries, citrus fruits, cranberries, grapes, kiwi, loganberries, macadamia nuts, nectarines, olives, peaches, pears, plums, raspberries, strawberries, asparagus, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, cantaloupe, honeydew, onions, pumpkins, squash, watermelon, alfalfa hay and seed, cotton lint, cotton seed, legume seed, peanuts, rapeseed, soybeans, sugar beets and sunflowers.

In fact, Ohio State University's honeybee specialist, James Tew, recently told the following to the Dayton Daily News....

"The average person should care. Bees of all species are fundamental to the operation of our ecosystem."

So what happens if they all die off?

You don't even want to think about that.

But certainly our scientists can find a solution, right?

Well, the World Organization for Animal Health announced on Wednesday that the huge die off of bees worldwide is not due to any one single factor.

Some of the factors for the honeybee deaths the World Organization for Animal Health included in its report include parasites, viral and bacterial infections, pesticides, and poor nutrition.

Other researchers claim that genetically modified crops and cell phone transmissions are also playing a role in the disappearance of the honeybees.

But the truth is that a "solution" seems to be very far away right now and we are running out of time.

The Deadly Tornadoes Which Have Ravaged The Southeast

Last Sunday saw an unprecedented outbreak of tornadoes across the southeast United States. Officials said 61 tornadoes erupted as a massive storm marched across states such as Mississippi, Florida and South Carolina.

Winds inside some of the tornadoes were clocked as high as 160 mph, and one of the tornadoes had a base one and a half miles wide.

The tornadoes killed at least 12 people, and it is estimated that the damage that they caused could reach into the billions of dollars.

The Drying Up Of The Ogallala Aquifer

Most Americans have never heard of the Ogallala Aquifer, but it is absolutely critical to food production in many areas of the United States.

The water from this massive underground lake is used to irrigate much of America's Great Plains. But it is being drained at a rate of approximately 800 gallons per minute and it is starting to dry up.

So why is that a bad thing?

Well, the Ogallala Aquifer is a gigantic underground lake that stretches from southern South Dakota all the way through northern Texas, covering approximately 174,000 square miles.

If it gets depleted, the era of "pivot irrigation" in the region will be over. That would mean that the Great Plains could quickly turn into the Great American Desert.

America could very well see a return to the Dust Bowl days of the 1930s.

Are you prepared for that?

Even if agricultural production continues to grow normally, scientists are telling us that the world is heading for a massive global food shortage. So what happens if our food production does not increase or is even reduced?

Sadly, the United States has only enough grain stored up to give about a half a loaf of bread to every man, woman and child in the United States.

How long do you think that is going to last in the event of a major emergency?

The truth is that "the good times" we have all grown up with are not going to last forever. The United States is in big trouble economically, and all of these natural disasters and environmental problems are not helping things one bit.

We are not entitled to endless wealth and prosperity just because we are Americans. In fact, we have recklessly squandered the wealth that prior generations have left for us.

But even as the economy crumbles around them, millions of Americans will remain in denial until the day they have to cook a dinner of "mouse soup" for their starving family.

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