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Chile miners to be pulled out Wenesday
October 10, 2010
9:04 pm
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greeney2
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Not many can imagine enduring this fate, its enough to make the strongest person shutter. The drill has broken into the chamber where they have been trapped over 2 months. Who would not just go a little nuts thinking about being down there. Who would trade places with them? Now comes the hard part, and lets hope they can all fit into the capsule. I would never fit. All the "what if's" will be going through all their minds every second now. Who goes first and who goes last, and keeping from panic. Can you imagine being the paramedic who is going to be lowered down inside? If this guy isn't brave and a hero, I'm President of the United States. Lets all Pray hard things go perfect, these poor men have suffered enough.

Minister says Wednesday rescue likely in Chile
Buzz up!44 votes ShareretweetEmailPrint AP – A relative of a trapped miner gestures after the announcement that a drill reached the trapped miners …
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By MICHAEL WARREN, Associated Press Writer Michael Warren, Associated Press Writer – Sat Oct 9, 11:54 pm ET
SAN JOSE MINE, Chile – Chile's trapped miners cheered and embraced Saturday when a drill punched an escape shaft into an underground chamber in a spray of rock and dust on the 66th day of their agonizing entombment, opening the way for rescuers to set plans to begin lifting the men out by midweek.

The government's mining minister said late Saturday that the extraction of the 33 men will probably begin Wednesday, after an inspection revealed that the new hole is mostly strong enough to enable them to escape safely. He said only a stretch at the top will be reinforced with steel pipe.

The completion of the rescue shaft caused bedlam in the tent city known as "Camp Hope," where the miners' relatives have held vigil since a cave-in sealed off the gold and copper mine Aug. 5.

Miners videotaping the drill breaking through a chamber's ceiling 2,041 feet (622 meters) underground could be seen cheering joyfully and hugging each other, the drillers said. At the surface, the rescuers chanted, danced and sprayed champagne so excitedly that some of their hard hats tumbled off.

"On the video, they all started shouting and hugging and celebrating," said James Stefanic, operations manager for the U.S.-Chilean drilling company Geotec.

The success of the escape shaft was a tremendous relief for families of the miners.

"We feel an enormous happiness," said Darwin Contreras, whose brother Pedro, a 26-year-old heavy machine operator, is stuck down below. "Now we just have to wait for them to get out, just a little bit longer now."

Contractor Jeff Hart of Denver, Colorado, operated the drill, pounding through solid rock and the detritus of the collapsed mine, which corkscrews deep below a remote hill in Chile's Atacama desert.

"There is nothing more important than saving — possibly saving — 33 lives. There's no more important job than that," Hart said. "We've done our part, now it's up to them to get the rest of the way out."

While the "Plan A" and "Plan C" drills stalled after repeatedly veering off course, the "Plan B" T130 drill reached the miners at 8:05 a.m. (8:05 a.m. EDT; 1200 GMT), after 33 days of drilling.

The milestone thrilled Chileans, who have come to see the rescue drama as a test of the nation's character and pride.

"What began as a potential tragedy is becoming a verified blessing," President Sebastian Pinera said in a triumphant speech at the La Moneda palace in Santiago. "When we Chileans set aside our legitimate differences and unify in a grand and noble cause, we are capable of great things."

But there is still a lot to do, Mining Minister Laurence Golborne stressed.

"We still haven't rescued anybody," he said. "This rescue won't be over until the last person below leaves this mine."

Video inspections of the shaft gave rescuers enough confidence to reinforce only the first 315 feet (96 meters). The plan is to insert 16 sections of half-inch-thick steel pipe into the top of the hole, which curves like a waterfall at first before becoming nearly vertical for most of its depth. The work would begin immediately, Golborne said.

It's impossible to eliminate any possibility of an accident, but the hole "is in very good condition, and doesn't need to be cased completely," he said.

Golborne and other government officials had insisted that determining whether to encase the whole shaft, only part of it or none of it would be a technical decision, based on the evidence and the expertise of a team of eight geologists and mining engineers.

But the political consequences were inescapable, since Chile's success story would evaporate if a miner should get stuck on the way up for reasons that might have been avoided.

Some miners' families wanted the entire shaft lined with pipe, but some engineers involved said the risk of the capsule getting jammed in the unreinforced hole was less than the risk of the pipes getting jammed and ruining their hard-won exit route.

Many experts doubted whether encasing the entire shaft was even possible.

"Based on my experiences it cannot be done. Nor does it need to be done," Brandon Fisher, president of a U.S. drilling equipment company, told The Associated Press on Saturday.

"The rock is very confident down there," he said.

The miners' anxiety is growing about the rescue, which should take about a day and a half to complete, Health Minister Jaime Manalich said.

Manalich also confirmed that a list had been drawn up suggesting the order in which the 33 miners should be rescued. The final order will be determined by a navy special forces paramedic who will be lowered into the mine to prepare the men for their journey.

When they are brought to the surface, the miners will be initially examined at a field hospital where they'll be allowed to briefly reunite with up to three close relatives.

Then, they'll be flown by helicopter in small groups to the regional hospital in Copiapo, capital city of the region where the mine is located, where 33 fresh beds await and they will be observed for at least 48 hours. Only after their physical and mental health is thoroughly examined will they be allowed to go home.

"I'm very excited, very happy," Guadalupe Alfaro, mother of 26-year-old trapped miner Carlos Bugueno, said as she waved a Chilean flag outside her tent. "I'm very excited, very content. I've wanted so long for this moment, I woke up to live this moment. My son will return soon."

"Our nervousness is gone now," said Juan Sanchez, whose son Jimmy is in the mine. "Only now can we begin to smile."

October 13, 2010
7:48 am
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greeney2
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Watched live coverage of the first 3 miners pulled out, and the 4th is almost ready to come up. 3 rescue personal have gone down and are in the cavern with the men. Quite a moving sight to see them come up. Lets all hope and pray all goes without a problem. These have to be the bravest people I've ever herd of.

October 13, 2010
6:02 pm
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Got up this morning and 15 are out so far.

October 14, 2010
1:27 am
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greeney2
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28 up 29th on the way up now.

October 14, 2010
3:07 am
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sandra
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Yeah ...very brave men, just to even imagine slightly what these men experienced.

Are they all up now??

“Living backwards!” Alice repeated in great
astonishment. “I never heard of such a thing!”
“—but there’s one great advantage in it, that one’s
memory works both ways.”
— Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass

October 14, 2010
6:15 am
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All are up.

I was amazed when I heard that for the first 17 days, all they had between them were 2 cans of tuna and a small amount of milk.

How many people would have given up and gone nuts after just 2 days of that? But 17 straight days??? Unbelievable. Imagine how happy they were when they heard the first response to their tap signals.

Every one who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science becomes convinced that a spirit is manifest in the laws of the Universe-a spirit vastly superior to that of man. - Albert Einstein

October 14, 2010
8:50 am
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greeney2
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The last man out took control and the men respected and listened to him. He rationed everyone to only 2 teasspoons of Tuna, a cracker and small amount of milk or water every 48 hours. This has to be the most unbelievable story of human endurance and the will to live. I have no words for the bravery they all have showed. In the end they all wanted to be last out, where most people would have killed to be first. I would not have lasted very long I;m afraid. What a miraical they ended up traped in a place they could stand and walk. Had they not had a room tall enough, how would the tube and capsule ever have worked. Thank God they had some means of light for the first 17 days, and Thank God they had a way to get them food and water. I can not imagine giving them the news, they would be trapped until Christmas.

What a sereal site to see the first rescuer to into the cavern, and see him walk out and be inside the cave with the men. It was so odd to see the first men walk up to the capsule and greet him. What must have gone through their minds the agony of 69 days, and this man lowers himself 2000 feet deep no knowing if he would become trapped too. The idea of being stuck in the capsule is enough to make you go mad.

What a human feat this has been to rescue them all, and they are all alive after such an ordeal. Not one of them panicked in the capsule, not one of them panicked in the order of going out. No average person would ever ride the capsule down into that place, and 5 of them did it to save them. Incredible bravery and heroism by all of them.

October 14, 2010
6:52 pm
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5 Lessons From the Uplifting Chilean Mine Rescue
Buzz up!0 votes ShareretweetEmailPrintJohn Hudson John Hudson – Thu Oct 14, 6:43 am ET
WASHINGTON, DC – All 33 miners have been rescued from the San Jose mine in Chile and given a clean bill of health. It was a fantastic feat of ingenuity and perseverance. Of course, like any headline grabber, there are different takeaways coming from different pundits. Here are five of the lessons being drawn from the heroic rescue:

The Rescue Disproves Ruthless Capitalism, says Chris Matthews at MSNBC:

The message coming out of the Tea Party people, and lot of them are good people, is every man for himself, basically. "No more taxes, no more government, no more everything. No more safety net. No more health care for everybody. Everybody just get out there, make your buck, save it, screw the government, move on." ...You know these people, if they were every man for himself down in that mine they wouldn't have gotten out. They would have been killing each other after about two days.

This is a story of how people can work together, the people who were down there for two months. The people who were above ground from all over the world, using state of the art equipment not to get rid of the need for manpower but to save manpower in this case.

No, Capitalism Saved the Miners, counters Daniel Henninger at The Wall Street Journal:
If those miners had been trapped a half-mile down like this 25 years ago anywhere on earth, they would be dead. What happened over the past 25 years that meant the difference between life and death for those men? Short answer: the Center Rock drill bit.

This is the miracle bit that drilled down to the trapped miners. Center Rock Inc. is a private company in Berlin, Pa. It has 74 employees. ...

Longer answer: The Center Rock drill, heretofore not featured on websites like Engadget or Gizmodo, is in fact a piece of tough technology developed by a small company in it for the money, for profit. That's why they innovated down-the-hole hammer drilling. If they make money, they can do more innovation.This profit = innovation dynamic was everywhere at that Chilean mine. The high-strength cable winding around the big wheel atop that simple rig is from Germany. Japan supplied the super-flexible, fiber-optic communications cable that linked the miners to the world above.

God Saved the Miners, says Mario Sepulveda, one of the rescued miners speaking to CNN:
During the time he was trapped inside the mine, Sepulveda said, he saw both good and evil.

"I was with God, and I was with the devil. They fought, and God won," he said. Sepulveda said he grabbed God's hand and never doubted that he would be rescued.

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Everybody's God Saved the Miners, writes David Gibson at Politics Daily:
Different churches are laying claim to inspiring divine intervention in the remarkable rescue, giving short shrift to the impressive technological achievement of the Chilean engineers (and a giant U.S.-made drill) in their efforts to get a leg up on the competition for souls in South America's newly diverse religious marketplace.

"God has spoken to me clearly and guided my hand each step of the rescue," said Carlos Parra Diaz, a Seventh-day Adventist pastor at the San Jose Mine in Chile's mountainous Atacama Desert. "He wanted the miners to be rescued and I am His instrument."
A Pentecostal and an evangelical pastor also worked the site, and American evangelicals with the Orlando-based Campus Crusade for Christ sent each of the miners an MP3 player containing the entire New Testament and "The Story of Jesus," the audio adaptation of the famous "Jesus Film."

...when contact was made with the miners, they also requested that statues of the Virgin Mary and the saints and religious pictures be sent down, in addition to a crucifix... And the miners all signed a flag that was ferried up and sent to Pope Benedict XVI in Rome.

The Miners Saved NASA, writes Ned Potter at ABC News:
The Chile experience has been a ray of light for NASA, whose people may feel they sometimes are trapped in darkness themselves. While the agency has expertise that helped in the mining drama -- for instance, how to take care of people in confined places (like astronauts) -- its primary mission (where to send those astronauts next) has been muddled, the subject of acrimonious debate between the Obama administration and members of Congress.

Experts say NASA can be very, very effective when its mission is clear. ...

But since the glory days of Apollo, the space program has struggled to find clear goals for its astronauts. Their future has been hotly debated this year -- one reason a success in Chile has been so welcome.

October 14, 2010
7:28 pm
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Aquarian
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Unfortunately, the demagoguery has already began to chime in, as we see with nauseating pontifications from darling Chris Matthews and David Gibson.

The rescue was a testament of the Organized Collective Human Spirit; despite the religious influence of the miners and their invocations of God, what we witnessed in these days throughout their ordeal, was the manifestation of cooperation and labor-solidarity. It was an effort by scientists from all the over the world, engineers from all over the world, and the relentless fortitutde of the actual miners. Furthermore, the owner of San Esteban mine, a money-hungry profiteer, was responsible for previous acts of criminal negligence. Number one, the fact that the whole they were in was 2,300 feet underground represents that the miners mattered less than what they were extracting (whatever it was). Secondly, the mine had faced a not so lucky incident back in 2007:

The San Jose mine suffered serious damage in a 2007 explosion and was expected to close, but the owners resumed operations, despite being mandated to shut down because of safety violations. Twelve miners have been killed in the mine in recent years.

After the collapse, the miners could have escaped through an evacuation exit, but there was no legally mandated emergency ladder. A second collapse 48 hours later then blocked the exit. The mine galleries were shored up with wood rather than stronger steel supports because wood is cheaper.

http://blogs.ajc.com/cynthia-tucker/201 ... py-ending/

Very similar to the CEOs who were criminally negligent in US mines (Massey).

Let's not use this opportunity to superimpose sickening jingoism and gratuitous exploitation of the situation as Obama did when he mentioned that the man who had punched the whole in the mine was an American soldier who served in Afghanistan; ignoring the multinational effort that went into this rescue operation.

The Few assume to be the deputies, but they are often only the despoilers of the Many.
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

October 14, 2010
7:59 pm
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Nobody has said this was not an international effort, and the above artical even points this out.

despite the religious influence of the miners and their invocations of God, what we witnessed in these days throughout their ordeal, was the manifestation of cooperation and labor-solidarity. It was an effort by scientists from all the over the world, engineers from all over the world, and the relentless fortitutde of the actual miners.

And what was the guiding light that gave them this fortitude? You might as well include dispite the Prayers and Faith of the entire world and the nation of Chile, the fact these men requested religious things sent down to them, and the prayers of billions of people around the globe. Seems like you are already on the Atheism platform which again ignores the beliefs of Billions.

You never uttered a word on this post for the last days, until they were all safe and rescued, now the only thing you can say is insult the religious beliefs of all these men.

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