Chile miners not doing to well | General Discussion Topics | Forum

A A A
Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —






— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Chile miners not doing to well
August 5, 2011
8:33 pm
Avatar
greeney2
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 10165
Member Since:
April 9, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

The Chile mine disaster: a year later
By Mike Krumboltz

PostsEmailBy Mike Krumboltz | The Upshot – 21 hrs agotweet16ShareEmailPrint
Click image for more photos. REUTERS/John Kolesidis

On August 5, 2010, the Earth opened in northern Chile and swallowed 33 miners. For 69 days, they were trapped half a mile down. The miners stayed strong while the rest of the world kept vigil, and, more than two months later, all 33 men were retrieved. The rescue was watched by more than a billion people.

The one-year anniversary of the mine's collapse has inspired a tremendous amount of interest in the heroes who faced staggering odds to survive their ordeal. Over the past week, web searches for "chile miners today" and "chile miners update" have both surged. Though information on some of the miners is scant, newspapers and programs have profiled many of the men. Unfortunately, over the past year, heartache and illness have been the rule rather than the exception.

According to an article from the U.K. Telegraph, some of the rescued miners have expressed an interest in returning to mining. One miner, Pablo Rojas, told the newspaper, "I've gone back, because it's my life. I've been doing it from the age of 16, and I don't know how to do anything else." But almost half the men have been without a job since the mine accident.

Indeed, though some might think the miners' fame guaranteed they need never work again, that hasn't been the case. According to the AP, "just one, the flamboyant Mario Sepulveda, has managed to live well off the fame. Most have signed up to give motivational speeches. Four, so far, have gone back underground to pound rock for a living." Sepulveda, on the other hand, formed a business consulting service and hired a public relations agent.

Six months before the mine's collapse, Sepulveda "oversaw a campaign to build homes for people affected by a massive earthquake in Chile."

Some survivors are battling physical ailments. Other survivors suffer on a more personal level. Edison Peña, the miner who jogged to keep in shape while trapped underground, was a media darling at first. He ran the New York City Marathon, cut the cake at Elvis Presley's birthday celebration in Graceland, and even sang an Elvis tune on "Letterman." But in recent months, he has also come under criticism for some bad habits. According to the Telegraph, his partner Angelica said, "If both God and the devil were down that mine, I think that probably the devil took him."

Some doctors were concerned that the miners didn't get enough time to rehabilitate, both mentally and physically. Alex Vega is bothered by loud noises and built a wall around his house for reasons he doesn't even understand. Ariel Ticona, the miner whose wife, Elizabeth, was pregnant and has since given birth to a baby named Hope, says her husband doesn't sleep well. The Guardian writes, "at New Year he simply disappeared to the south of the country at the last moment, leaving Elizabeth at home with their two young boys and a baby girl."

"60 Minutes" ran a story on the miners back in February. According to the program, "all but one of the 33 men, doctors say, have suffered severe psychological problems since the accident." For example, Victor Zamora, upon returning to the mine for the first time since being rescued, said that he feels "lots of sadness" and that he would "prefer to be dead."

They have also been the subject of a book, "33 Men: Inside the Miraculous Survival and Dramatic Rescue of the Chilean Miners." In a radio interview, author Jonathan Franklin explains that all but one of the men suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder.

One thing that has gone well for the miners: their ability to stick together while negotiating. Though there have been spats and in-fighting, the men have collectively negotiated the movie rights to their story--which may yet help them secure a bit of comfort in the years ahead.

August 6, 2011
4:26 am
Avatar
bionic
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 9870
Member Since:
April 9, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

wow..maybe they are suffering from some kind of heavy metal poisoning?

Willie Wonka quotes..
What is this Wonka, some kind of funhouse?
Why? Are you having fun?
A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men.
We are the music makers, we are the dreamers of dreams

August 6, 2011
4:39 am
Avatar
at1with0
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 9243
Member Since:
April 9, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

maybe they're suffering because they were trapped in a mine for 69 days (wow). 😎

"it is easy to grow crazy"

August 6, 2011
5:14 pm
Avatar
bionic
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 9870
Member Since:
April 9, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

there is that
but hey..free now, right?
instead of fretting they should be praying for any other future potentually stuck miners out there..knowing full well the hazards of mining..and where it could lead
or not lead
I bet no matter how those guys are..their families are glad to have them back..their wives..kids..etc..

Willie Wonka quotes..
What is this Wonka, some kind of funhouse?
Why? Are you having fun?
A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men.
We are the music makers, we are the dreamers of dreams

August 6, 2011
6:02 pm
Avatar
at1with0
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 9243
Member Since:
April 9, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

PTSD is a formidable enemy...

"it is easy to grow crazy"

August 6, 2011
8:54 pm
Avatar
greeney2
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 10165
Member Since:
April 9, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Protesters throw fruit at Chile's rescued miners
By EVA VERGARA | AP – 3 hrs agotweet9ShareEmailPrintRelated ContentPolice officers scuffle with demonstrators outside a museum that was hosting an event …

Demonstrators chant slogans outside a museum that was hosting an event honoring the …
COPIAPO, Chile (AP) — It has been a bittersweet anniversary for Chile's rescued miners, who were honored as heroes in their hometown only to come under attack by anti-government protesters who threw fruit and small stones at them, accusing them of being ungrateful, greedy sellouts.

Chilean President Sebastian Pinera and his ministers joined most of the 33 miners Friday at a Catholic Mass and then the inauguration of a regional museum exhibit recognizing their remarkable survival story.

But the events were marred by scuffles between riot police and students, teachers, environmentalists and other miners, all trying to make Pinera bow to their pressure on issues from reforming public education and increasing miners' pay to stopping controversial dams and power plants.

Some of the activists threw oranges and apples at the miners, accusing them of getting too cozy with Pinera's government and trying to cash in on their fame.

The treatment shocked rescued miner Omar Reygadas into silence. His son told The Associated Press in an interview that his father was deeply hurt to be accused of selling out to the government. Other activists shouted that the miners were trying to get rich with their $17 million lawsuit accusing Chile's mine regulator of failing to enforce safety requirements.

"My father was saddened, deeply saddened. He doesn't understand how people could act this way," said his son, also named Omar Reygadas. "When I got home I found him sitting alone, very sad. I asked him what happened and at first he wouldn't say anything, but gradually he let on what happened."

Some Chilean newspapers called the attack a low blow, especially considering how many of the miners still suffer from psychological problems after being stuck for 69 days underground.

"They aren't heroes ... they're victims who are simply trying to recover from their tragedy," El Diario de Atacama, Copiapo's hometown newspaper, printed Saturday under a picture showing riot police with a confiscated box of oranges and apples activists had thrown at the honorees.

"We have become accustomed to judging the 33 of Atacama, forgetting that they've only been victims of the terrible circumstances that confront hundreds of Chileans every day."

The miners were clearly grateful for Pinera's leadership of the rescue mission, which succeeded in bringing them all out alive more than two months after the Aug. 5, 2010 collapse. "I wouldn't be here talking with you today" if Pinera hadn't become personally involved, miner Jose Fuentes told the AP. "We were down there praying that he would do it."

But Pinera's ministers also are defending the government against the miners' suit, saying that they have to protect the Chilean taxpayers.

Pinera's popularity has plunged to 26 percent, the lowest of any president since Chile recovered its democracy in 1990, as protests have roiled the country. Environmentalists hope to block hydroelectric dams in southern Patagonia and a huge coal-fired energy plant in northern Chile. Unionized miners have briefly paralyzed the nation's largest copper mines, costing companies millions of dollars in lost production. Mapuche Indians have occupied ancestral lands, setting off violent confrontations with police and landowners. Striking high school and university students have taken over their schools and stopped classes for more than two months.

At the museum on Friday, Pinera appealed for an end to the unrest.

"The time of the protests, the strikes, the takeovers, the violence has passed. Now has come the time to construct and not keep destroying, the time of dialogue and not of intransigence; the time of solutions and not of confrontation, the time of unity and not of division," Pinera said.

August 6, 2011
10:45 pm
Avatar
bionic
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 9870
Member Since:
April 9, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

that story took a strange turn, huh?

those poor fricken minors

people make me sick sometimes..the ignorance of people..and mob mentalities

acting out without knowing all the facts

Willie Wonka quotes..
What is this Wonka, some kind of funhouse?
Why? Are you having fun?
A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men.
We are the music makers, we are the dreamers of dreams

August 7, 2011
12:02 am
Avatar
at1with0
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 9243
Member Since:
April 9, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

"bionic" wrote: acting out without knowing all the facts

Indeed.

"it is easy to grow crazy"

Forum Timezone: America/Los_Angeles

Most Users Ever Online: 288

Currently Online: lift710
42 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

greeney2: 10165

bionic: 9870

at1with0: 9243

Lashmar: 5289

tigger: 4576

rath: 4297

DIss0n80r: 4161

sandra: 3858

frrostedman: 3815

Wing-Zero: 3278

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 2

Members: 23656

Moderators: 0

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 8

Forums: 32

Topics: 8546

Posts: 122721

Newest Members:

lift710, Garcia, jerry smith, Haug, sarbaz hassan, Lara, Raymond, ufosightingsfootage, Lacerta, Guszop

Administrators: John Greenewald: 516, blackvault: 1777