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B53 9 megaton bomb dismantled
October 25, 2011
9:23 pm
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greeney2
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I wonder how close we really were in 1962 of doomsday? Imagine a few dozen of these going in 2 directions, or most likly hundreds of them.

US's most powerful nuclear bomb being dismantled
By BETSY BLANEY - Associated Press | AP – 30 mins agotweet329Share45EmailPrintRelated Contentprevnext View GalleryA B53 bomb is seen in this handout taken October 19, 2011 and released October 20, …

Workers unload a B53 bomb in this handout taken February 14, 2011 and released October …

This undated handout photo provided by the National Nuclear Security Administration …
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14 photos - 19 hrs agoMost powerful U.S. nuclear bomb
4 photos - 8 hrs agoSee latest photos »AMARILLO, Texas (AP) — The last of the nation's most powerful nuclear bombs — a weapon hundreds of times stronger than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima — is being disassembled nearly half a century after it was put into service at the height of the Cold War.

The final components of the B53 bomb will be broken down Tuesday at the Pantex Plant near Amarillo, the nation's only nuclear weapons assembly and disassembly facility. The completion of the dismantling program is a year ahead of schedule, according to the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, and aligns with President Barack Obama's goal of reducing the number of nuclear weapons.

Thomas D'Agostino, the nuclear administration's chief, called the bomb's elimination a "significant milestone."

Put into service in 1962, when Cold War tensions peaked during the Cuban Missile Crisis, the B53 weighed 10,000 pounds and was the size of a minivan. According to the American Federation of Scientists, it was 600 times more powerful than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, killing as many as 140,000 people and helping end World War II.

The B53 was designed to destroy facilities deep underground, and it was carried by B-52 bombers.

With its destruction, the next largest bomb in operation will be the B83, said Hans Kristensen, a spokesman for the Federation of American Scientists. It's 1.2 megatons, while the B53 was 9 megatons.

The B53's disassembly ends the era of big megaton bombs, he said. The bombs' size helped compensate for their lack of accuracy. Today's bombs are smaller but more precise, reducing the amount of collateral damage, Kristensen said.

Since the B53 was made using older technology by engineers who have since retired or died, developing a disassembly process took time. Engineers had to develop complex tools and new procedures to ensure safety.

"We knew going in that this was going to be a challenging project, and we put together an outstanding team with all of our partners to develop a way to achieve this objective safely and efficiently," said John Woolery, the plant's general manager.

Many of the B53s were disassembled in the 1980s, but a significant number remained in the U.S. arsenal until they were retired from the stockpile in 1997. Pantex spokesman Greg Cunningham said he couldn't comment on how many of the bombs have been disassembled at the Texas plant.

The weapon is considered dismantled when the roughly 300 pounds of high explosives inside are separated from the special nuclear material, known as the pit. The uranium pits from bombs dismantled at Pantex will be stored on an interim basis at the plant, Cunningham said.

The non-nuclear material and components are then processed, which includes sanitizing, recycling and disposal, the National Nuclear Security Administration said last fall when it announced the Texas plant's role in the B53 dismantling.

The plant will play a large role in similar projects as older weapons are retired from the U.S.'s nuclear arsenal.

October 26, 2011
7:07 am
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thunder
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wish we didnt have to have any of those. good to see that one gone, it was old and god knows how stable it still was.

October 26, 2011
7:09 am
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thunder
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if thay had greeney2 god only knows if any of us would be around now. WAY to close for comfert.

October 26, 2011
7:42 am
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greeney2
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I'm only 2 yrs younger than you Thunder, and I was 15 during the crisis. Everyone was scared that understood what was going on. We have a neighbor that reciently removed one of those bomb shelters, we would see being sold up at our shopping center, in the early 60's. They would have one on a flatbed truck, outside of our supermarket. They dug a hole, and lowered these metal structures into the hole and covered it up. Might have made a great tornado shelter in the midwest but people bought them. People were scared, Russia was testing bombs much bigger than this is Siberia, fallout was showing in Wisconson dairy products. We were still doing open atmosphere testing too. Our neighbor took their shelter out to build a addition on their home. There kids used it as a playhouse, after that it just rotted away. I'm sure you remember Nikita Kruzchev pounding his shoe on a podium, screaming Russia will bury the USA. An interview with his son revieled that Kruzchev was convinced JFK would nuke them, and he was right. JFK had deducted the only option would have been for the USA to First Strike them. Had Nikita not turned the ships around, I sure wonder how close JFK was.

October 26, 2011
10:10 pm
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bionic
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Crazy!(as in, we humans be..)
Do you guys remember the mini series, 'The Day After'?
It came out in either the late sevenites or early eighties.
I remember it really shaking me to my core as a kid.

Willie Wonka quotes..
What is this Wonka, some kind of funhouse?
Why? Are you having fun?
A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men.
We are the music makers, we are the dreamers of dreams

October 27, 2011
3:23 pm
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"The Day After" was a huge propaganda coup by the government and Hollywood working together to scare the crap out of Americans and it worked. Americans are easily afrighted by much of what comes across their television and movie screens.

I knew this because right after the program there were "Experts " brought on to comment on the movie for us ...such that we would tow the party line. " Da !!?? Komrade!!??"
I remember they put Henry Kissenger on the screen to comment on this film when the movie was over.

A propaganda piece. For you see...Pravda is alive and well here in the States..as well.

Want something to be scared of...keep an eye on the economy..not just here but in Europe as well.

In my thinking...what someone cannot do with weapons or invasion...they are trying to do with economics and it will be just as devastating ...if not more so.

I learned this many years ago by reading John Maynard Keynes..."The Economic Consequences of the Peace."

This book was written Back in the 1920s.

Lenin is said to have declared that the best way to destroy the capitalist system was to debauch the currency. By a continuing process of inflation, governments can confiscate, secretly and unobserved, an important part of the wealth of their citizens. By this method they not only confiscate, but they confiscate arbitrarily; and, while the process impoverishes many, it actually enriches some.

I wouldn't be so worried about nuclear weapons in the hands of other nations....I would be worried more about what our own government is doing fiscally in it's incompetence...or by intention. No bombs..no tanks...AK 47s et al. Just plain olde inflation/depreciation of the currency.

Printing paper monies or continued borrowing by deficit can be just as destructive as nuclear weapons, if not more, so to a people and a nation. History is replete with this example.

Orangetom

October 27, 2011
6:29 pm
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greeney2
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It doesn't take an acutal bomb anymore, just a threat of it. All the terrorists need to do is sit back in a resort someplace, making threats all over this country and world. It costs us a fortune in taxpayer money to chase after them all, implement new "prodeedures", for security, and its manpower to do it. This alone is breaking the country, both on the government level, but in the private sector. Evrey sporting event, parade, hotel, tourist attraction, spends so much more on security, its driven every price up. Protecting everything from our water and utility supplies, to defence plants, bridges, National monuments costs us billions per year compared to before 911.

October 27, 2011
11:01 pm
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blackvault
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For those curious...

This was what the bomb looked like:

Image Enlarger

And this is what a 9.3 megaton nuclear bomb looks like when it goes off:

Image Enlarger

-----
John Greenewald, Jr.
The Black Vault Website Owner / Operator
http://www.theblackvault.com

October 28, 2011
3:05 pm
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"greeney2" wrote: It doesn't take an acutal bomb anymore, just a threat of it. All the terrorists need to do is sit back in a resort someplace, making threats all over this country and world. It costs us a fortune in taxpayer money to chase after them all, implement new "prodeedures", for security, and its manpower to do it. This alone is breaking the country, both on the government level, but in the private sector. Evrey sporting event, parade, hotel, tourist attraction, spends so much more on security, its driven every price up. Protecting everything from our water and utility supplies, to defence plants, bridges, National monuments costs us billions per year compared to before 911.

Greeny2,

I agree with your point above. Frightened of any and everything. The whole time government is slowly but surely turning on their own peoples to control and limit them and simultaneously freeing government.

Because of the urgency, because of the necessity, because of the emergency, you must submit to this new limit on your conduct/liberty to do or come and go as you require.

This pattern has been done over and over in different countries and to different peoples.

And this very bunch want a One Word.....Wow!!

Thanks,
Orangetom

October 29, 2011
6:28 am
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bionic
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[quote="orangetom1999Want something to be scared of...keep an eye on the economy..not just here but in Europe as well.

In my thinking...what someone cannot do with weapons or invasion...they are trying to do with economics and it will be just as devastating ...if not more so.

I learned this many years ago by reading John Maynard Keynes..."The Economic Consequences of the Peace."

This book was written Back in the 1920s.

Lenin is said to have declared that the best way to destroy the capitalist system was to debauch the currency. By a continuing process of inflation, governments can confiscate, secretly and unobserved, an important part of the wealth of their citizens. By this method they not only confiscate, but they confiscate arbitrarily; and, while the process impoverishes many, it actually enriches some.

I wouldn't be so worried about nuclear weapons in the hands of other nations....I would be worried more about what our own government is doing fiscally in it's incompetence...or by intention. No bombs..no tanks...AK 47s et al. Just plain olde inflation/depreciation of the currency.

Printing paper monies or continued borrowing by deficit can be just as destructive as nuclear weapons, if not more, so to a people and a nation. History is replete with this example.

Orangetom

Oh..I know..
I actually saw a reporter not too long ago doing an interview with some 'economic adviser' type. She actually said something along the lines of, "Does this mean we might be sinking into another recession?"

I was flabberghasted..how did she not see that we have been skirting a major depression for YEARS now (and not just us..the entire world)

Willie Wonka quotes..
What is this Wonka, some kind of funhouse?
Why? Are you having fun?
A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men.
We are the music makers, we are the dreamers of dreams

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